From the Why We Fight File

In Why We Fight: How Public Schools Cause Social Conflict, I explained that our public schooling system causes constant political and social battles because everyone, no matter what their values or educational goals, is forced to pay for the schools, but only the most politically powerful can control them. I also explained that the only viable way to defuse the situation is to give all parents school choice, so that they can take their children and the money intended to educate them to schools that share their values. Well, a story in this morning’s Chicago Tribune about a Windy City school engulfed in a battle over a required 7th grade reading book makes my point – and then some. Not only does it show the need to let parents choose their children’s schools because their values may differ, it also displays the arrogance that can come from school administrators who know that they have all the power:

Several dozen parents at a Southwest Side Chicago public school are calling for school officials to ban a controversial book they say is filled with references to sex and violence.

The book, “The Chocolate War,” which is required reading for 7th grade students, was blasted by parents at a Local School Council meeting Tuesday evening at the John H. Kinzie Elementary School in the Garfield Ridge neighborhood.

Nick Cortesi, who has a 2nd grader and a kindergartner at Kinzie, said school officials should remove the book because of its inappropriate content and adult themes.

“I’ll be dammed if they are going to be reading this filth,” Cortes said. “The issue is over whether it’s age-appropriate. What about the parents who are tax payers? Have we no say?”

At the meeting, Kinzie Principal Sean Egan told about 50 parents who showed up in the school’s cafeteria that he had informed public school administrators about their concerns and was told that officials thought the book was appropriate reading material.

“I don’t tell you how to run your family,” Egan told parents. “I support my teachers.”

After hearing from the district’s lawyers, the principal sent a letter to parents Monday informing them that the book would remain on the required reading list. He warned parents that if they directed their children not to read the book, it could “have a significant negative effect on the final course grade.”

“This book was selected for the very important, complex themes it covers, including conformity and the ethical implications of choices we make,” Egan wrote. “I want to assure you that the school has fully vetted this book. … A few parents have objected to the contents of the book, which addresses mature themes and contains some swearing. Decisions regarding the content of a school’s curriculum, however, lie with its educators and administrators.”