Vouchers vs. the District with ‘More Money than God’

Editor’s Note: This post was updated on March 9, 2009.

This week, education secretary Arne Duncan referred to DC public schools as a district with “more money than God.” Perhaps he was thinking of the $24,600 total per-pupil spending figure I reported last year in the Washington Post and on this blog. If so, he’s low-balling the number. With the invaluable help of my research assistant Elizabeth Li, I’ve just calculated the figure for the current school year. It is $26,555 per pupil.

In his address to Congress and his just-released budget, the president repeatedly called for efficiency in government education spending. At the same time, the Democratic majorities in the House and Senate have been trying to sunset funding for the DC voucher program that serves 1,700 poor kids in the nation’s capital. So it seems relevant to compare the efficiencies of these programs.

According to the official study of the DC voucher program, the average voucher amount is less than $6,000. That is less than ONE QUARTER what DC is spending per pupil on education. And yet, academic achievement in the voucher program is at least as good as in the District schools, and voucher parents are much happier with the program than are public school parents.

In fact, since the average income of participating voucher families is about $23,000, DC is currently spending almost as much per pupil on education as the vouchers plus the family income of the voucher recipients COMBINED.

So Mr. President and Secretary Duncan, could you please sit down with Democratic leaders in the Senate before next Monday’s vote on an amendment to keep funding the DC voucher program, and reassert to them your desire for efficiency and your opposition to kicking these children out of a program that they depend on?

Here are the details of, and sources for, the DC education spending calculation:

Excluding preschool, higher education, and charter schools, the main education expenditures in the District are as follows:

Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education $4,917,325
DCPS (k-12 relevant items only, see below) $593,961,000
OSSE (k-12 relevant items only, see below) $198,277,000
Office of Public Education Facilities Modernization $38,368,800
Non-public Tuition** $141,700,442
Special Education Transportation** $75,558,319
Capital funding $239,033,000
Total DC k-12 budget $1,291,815,886
DCPS official total enrollment (incl. special ed.) 48,646
Total per pupil spending $26,555

Budget Sources:

DC budget FY2009, Agency budget chapters, part 2

DC Budget FY2009, Capital Appendices, part 2

DC Budget FY2009, Operating Appendices, part 2

Enrollment Source:

Linda Faison at DCPS, e-mail, March 5, 2009

The non-k-12 items excluded from the OSSE budget were:

            amount      code     description

$36,697,000  A245 public charter financing and support
$85,943,000  a430 early care & education administration
$6,322,000  a431 childcare program development
$14,544,000  a432 pre-k and school readiness
$459,000  a433 early childhood infants and toddlers
$2,036,000  a434 income eligibility determination
$37,000  a440 career & technical education
$34,397,000  a475 DC Tag
$726,000  a470 post secondary educ & workforce readiness
$4,574,000  a471 career and tech education
$3,237,000  a472 adult and family education
$1,800,000  a477 adult scholarship

The non-k-12 item excluded from the DCPS budget was:

            amount      code     description

$58,780,000  2200 early childhood education

Transfers from OSSE to DCPS (count in OSSE budget, but not in DCPS budget):

Revenue code Amount

706 $18,172,000
727 $90,290,000
728 $1,370,000