Topic: Telecom, Internet & Information Policy

WSJ Weighs in Against ‘REAL Bad ID’

This morning’s Wall Street Journal opinion page blasts Republicans for passing the REAL ID Act.  [subscription required] 

Keyed to a recent report showing the costs of compliance at $11 billion, the piece notes that all Americans will have to reapply for their drivers’ licenses and ID cards if states go along with this unfunded federal surveillance mandate.  It also addresses whether a national ID protects against terrorism or provides effective immigration control and finds REAL ID wanting on both counts.  My book Identity Crisis shows why.

Sooner rather than later, Congress will recognize its error in passing the REAL ID Act.  Most likely it will try to kick the can down the road.  Look for a quiet attempt to change the deadline for getting a national ID in everyone’s hands. 

But that is not the solution.  If Congress wants a national ID, it should have hearings, markup and pass legislation, then fund and implement a national ID itself. 

Congress didn’t have a single hearing or up-or-down vote on the REAL ID Act.  This much exposure would kill a national ID plan, of course.

Bureaucracy and Lost Privacy

In my book Identity Crisis: How Identification is Overused and Misunderstood, I argue that identification is required of us too often by both corporations and government as we go about our business. I also do my best to articulate the reasons why this is bad, and how we can escape it.

With my senses tuned to the overuse of identification, I’m keenly aware of the osmotic process by which institutions soak up information about us, pass it around, and use it in ways we may not prefer.

Here’s an example from real life: I have recently spoken at several conferences dealing with identification, identity, financial risk management, and the like. When the time came to get reimbursement for my travel, one of the conference organizers asked me to give my Social Security Number if I was going to rely on faxed receipts for reimbursement.

The e-mail thread below shows how complex IRS regulations require financial administrators in the corporate world to over-comply, collecting (and possibly filing with the government) information that neither entity needs.

This is bureaucracy in action (both public and private), and it’s the constant drip, drip, drip of privacy going away.

[Names have been changed to protect the guilty.]

*********************

—–Original Message—–

From: katie [at] conference [dot] org

Sent: Fri 9/29/2006 10:19 AM

To: Jim Harper

Subject: W-9 Forms Needed

Hello Jim,

Thank you so much for sending over your receipts.

Since you did not send me actual receipts, I need you to fill out this W-9 form and fax it back ASAP.

Thanks again,

-Katie

Katie Folsom

Conference Specialist

*****************************

Are you sure? This is reimbursement for travel, not income. And even if it were income, I believe the amount in question here would not even require a W-9. (Also, I’m traveling through Sunday without access to a printer or fax. ;-)

Having suffered through my talk, you probably understand that I don’t needlessly share information with the government or with organizations who are going to needlessly share with the government.

If you could politely ask your accounting folks to show where the law or IRS instructions require them to have my SSN to reimburse me for travel, I would appreciate it. (I’m not a tax law expert, just knowledgeable enough to be dangerous/annoying.) If they can’t show that they need this information, they don’t need it.

Thanks! Sorry for being prickly, but it’s my job.

Jim

Jim Harper

Director of Information Policy Studies

The Cato Institute

***************************

—–Original Message—–

From: elizabeth [at] conference [dot] org

Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 11:32 AM

To: Jim Harper

Cc: Katie [at] conference [dot] org

Subject: Re: Fw: W-9 Forms Needed

Hi Jim,

While I understand your concern regarding needlessly sharing information, IRS regulations specify that a W-9 must be filled out whenever receiving income from a company. Please see the “Purpose of Form” section on the front of the W-9. Your travel reimbursement is technically considered income.

One way around this (to avoid having to fill a W-9 out), however, is to send us all of you Original receipts and get reimbursed on those. Basically, in layman’s terms, the IRS is trying to avoid “double-dipping”. If we reimburse someone for receipt copies, that person can then claim/deduct the originals on their own personal/business taxes. The W-9 form is the IRS’ tracking solution to this.

Please let Katie what you intend to do, so she can be on the lookout for either your W-9 form or your original receipts in the mail (sent with tracking information for your protection). I hope this cleared things up a bit.

Thank you.

Elizabeth

Elizabeth LaFontaine

Senior Accountant

*********************

“Jim Harper”

10/03/2006 06:04 PM

To elizabeth [at] conference [dot] org

cc Katie [at] conference [dot] org

Subject RE: Fw: W-9 Forms Needed

Hi Elizabeth –

Sorry for the delay. I’ve been traveling. Again.

As I understand it (and I have double-checked), W-9s are needed when you are going to file a 1099. If you believe that there is a requirement to file a 1099 on reimbursement of my travel expenses, could you please tell me where that is? Which 1099 would you file? If you think that it’s the 1099-MISC, please note that the threshold amount for filing the 1099-MISC is $600 in income.

And I have strong doubts that this is income. If you were to file a 1099 dealing with reimbursement for travel expenses, the IRS would be looking for it on my 1040, and I have never included travel expenses on a 1040.

Let me apologize for being a stickler about this, but many administrators believe they have to collect SSNs when they do not. It may be that you are over-collecting SSNs and possibly even filing forms you don’t need to.

If you can point me to documents showing that I’m mistaken, I welcome being corrected. But unless you do, I’m pretty sure that you don’t need a W-9 and can issue a check to me.

Thanks!

Jim

Jim Harper

Director of Information Policy Studies

The Cato Institute

************************

Hi Jim,

As I stated in my previous email, you do not need to fill out a W-9 if you do not wish to. Simply send all of your original receipts to Katie so she can process your check. Unfortunately, that is the only way you will be reimbursed. Sorry for any inconvenience, but those are the policies we strictly abide by and they in no way infringe upon any reservations you may have about providing information you don’t want to provide.

Please let Katie know when she can be expecting your receipts in the mail. We will reimburse you $4.55 for Priority mail with Delivery Confirmation if you’d like.

Regards,

Elizabeth

Elizabeth LaFontaine

Senior Accountant

Sending Up Security

People are highly tuned risk managers. Daily, we make decision about risky things like crossing streets. To do so, we analyze the speed and density of traffic, light conditions, our own physical skills, and myriad other factors to determine whether to cross in the middle of a block or at a controlled intersection.

Five years since 9/11, people are getting better at assessing the risks of terrorist acts. And people are growing increasingly skeptical of the risk choices being made for them by the Department of Homeland Security. The evidence? Their willingness to see security lampooned.

The writers at The Onion are undoubtedly finding a good reception for this send-up of the Transportation Security Administration’s liquids rules.

And people are diverting themselves from their exasperation with airport security using this fun game

A basic indictment of government-provided security is in daily newspapers’ comic sections this morning. Syndicated cartoon Bizarro by Dan Piraro is titled “Orientation Seminar at Homeland Security.” It depicts a teacher at a chalkboard that says “Inconvenience = Security.” (Available online here early next month). 

The funny bone is a highly tuned instrument, and it’s showing the dissonance in air security today. 

Baltimore Sun: Deep-Six REAL ID

The Baltimore Sun opinion page recognizes that the REAL ID Act’s national ID system “will neither weed out terrorists nor make a dent in the flow of illegal immigration - the two problems it was devised to address.”  In light of the exorbitant cost and impossibility to implement, its advice is to junk the REAL ID Act.

Feariness about Data Loss

In the spirit of Stephen Colbert’s “truthiness,” here’s another useful term for the pop lexicon:

fear i ness (fir’ e-nes) n. The quality of being feared, even though logic and/or evidence indicates there is little to fear.

A prime example of feariness right now is data loss — the loss of control over confidential information that could lead to violation of a person’s privacy, identity theft, and fraud. This feariness has been fanned by the recent thefts of government and corporate computer hardware containing important data files.

Though privacy violations and fraud are worrisome, an article in today’s New York Times explains that much of the alarm over data loss is just feariness:

The veterans’ laptop episode underscores the crucial distinction between data loss and malicious data theft — a distinction that has often been glossed over or ignored in the recent wave of alarming disclosures of data breaches at government agencies, universities, companies and hospitals. In most cases, the consequences — financial and otherwise — of the data losses have been slight.

But while high-profile data breaches are common, there is no evidence of a surge in identity theft or financial fraud as a result. In fact, there is scant evidence that identity theft and financial fraud have increased at all. Even when computer networks are cracked into, and troves of personal information intentionally stolen, fraudsters can typically exploit only a tiny fraction of it.

Readers of Cato’s Regulation Magazine already know this story. In last spring’s issue, Tom Lenard and Paul Rubin describe how the incidence of data theft–inducing fraud is fairly stable, how most of that fraud is the product of the theft of old-fashioned paper statements instead of electronic information, and how the response to data loss (including government-mandated response) is far more costly in aggregate than any resulting fraud.

Harpers Denounce Border Plan, ID Systems

A prominent Harper spoke out this week against the plan to require passports or passport-‘lite’ ID cards for crossing the U.S.-Canada border. That’s Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper. 

He is no relation to the Cato Institute’s director of information policy studies, Jim Harper, who spoke out about the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative’s PASS card system two weeks ago

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) sounds like a wonderful thing. It’s hard to be against travel. But WHTI is actually about shrinking commerce and travel among the friendly countries in our region.

In the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, Congress pushed the Department of Homeland Security to create an “automated biometric entry and exit data system” for people crossing the borders. A prominent proposal is the PASS card, which stands for People Access Security Service. It is envisioned as a card containing an RFID chip that is to be given to passport holders. The chip would alert the DHS when a person arrives at a border crossing. 

“Pre-positioning” data by sending an electronic signal from 30 or more feet sounds like it would make border crossings go faster. But moving identification data is not what takes time at border crossings — it’s checking to see if the person and the identity information match up. 

An RFID-chipped PASS card would mean that lots more information about American citizens’ movements would be collected. It’s a system not just verifying that travelers are citizens or legal aliens — it’s a system for collecting information about our comings and goings, yet another dimension of our lives revealed to the government to do with as it will.

Congress seems held in thrall by national ID systems. Last week, the House passed a bill to require showing identification cards for voting. And, of course, we already have the REAL ID Act, which by May 2008 will have states issuing drivers’ licenses and ID cards to national standards (sharing driver information nationwide, too) — if states comply. Harper of the Cato Institute testified to a New Mexico legislative committee about that issue last week. The National Conference of State Legislatures reports that compliance with the REAL ID Act will cost $11 billion dollars nationwide.

Identification seems to offer an easy technological quick-fix for ailments like illegal immigration and terrorism. But what most of these schemes would do is further regiment and control law-abiding people while merely inconveninencing criminals, terrorists, and any other threat with a modicum of sophistication and motivation.

My book Identity Crisis has more on this and all other facets of identification.