Topic: Political Philosophy

TV Is Great

Books? Newspapers? Who needs ‘em!

Take a look at this clip from the Colbert Report, which lampoons the overwrought reaction several politicians had to the recent Boumediene decision. (Tim Lynch wrote about it here, here, and here.) Fear-mongerers are increasingly looking like buffoons, thanks in part to the native common sense of comedy writers. And thus Colbert introduces Neal Katyal for a quick primer on the U.S. Constitution and the genius of its design.

Comedy Central doesn’t meet your standard? Not effete enough? TV has something for you too.

Here (in RealAudio and MP3 format) is a segment from Friday’s Newshour with Jim Lehrer on PBS in which something unique and exciting happens: A victim of the flooding in the midwest exhibits personal responsibility and does not ask for government help. Here’s the key couple of sentences:

Narrator Elizabeth Brackett: Despite the devastation, [flood victim Barb] Boyer, like many who farm in these floodplains, says she does not expect much government help.

Barb Boyer: We’ve always lived our life that we’re responsible for our own choices, our own destiny. And we chose not to carry the flood insurance. That was our responsibility. There’s a lot of people that - of course, we are going to need help, but do I expect it? No. We’ll start over. That’s all I know right now.

It’s stirring and inspiring to see people in dire straits who haven’t abandoned their values, the values that make this country great.

And it’s all brought to you by TV!

Seasteading and Dynamic Geography

Over at Ars Technica, I have an in-depth discussion of seasteading, an effort by a group of Silicon Valley libertarians to develop technology for living on the open oceans in a cost-effective manner. They argue that government is an industry with excessive barriers to entry, and they aim to change that by creating a turnkey solution for starting your own community.

History is littered with utopian projects, libertarian and otherwise, that fell far short of their lofty goals. At first glance, the Seasteading Institute looks like just another utopian scheme. But there are at least two reasons to think this one might accomplish more than its predecessors. First, recognizing that it would take many decades to develop a self-sufficient ocean metropolis, Friedman and his partners have chosen to focus largely on short-term engineering challenges. They want to build cheap, durable sea platforms that anyone can purchase. Second, they’ve raised half a million dollars from Peter Thiel, the libertarian entrepreneur who co-founded PayPal and is now a major investor in Facebook. Thiel’s backing will allow them to move beyond the extensive background work they’ve already done and begin the expensive task of actually designing and building their first prototype, which they hope to splash down in San Francisco Bay in the next few years.

Will this ultimately lead to the creation of libertarian metropolises in the open ocean? There are certainly lots of reasons to be skeptical. But there are also plenty of examples of technological change undermining existing hierarchies of authority. The invention of the printing press helped to undermine the authority of the Catholic church by democratizing access to knowledge. And in the 1960s, “pirate radio” ships, operating in international waters, helped to undermine many European states’ monopoly on radio broadcasting by beaming the latest pop tunes to eager European listeners. In this month’s Cato unbound, we’re talking about the ways that technological change is challenging traditional copyright law. Swedish copyright activist Rasmus Fleischer kicks things off arguing that advances in Internet connectivity and portable digital storage will make it effectively impossible for the authorities to control the dissemination of copyrighted works. My reaction to his essay will be up tomorrow.

Hence, policy changes are frequently the result of technological progress. Hierarchical institutions often exert control through the exploitation of technological limitations. The Catholic Church exploited the high costs of reproducing the written word; today’s copyright industries are built on the formerly-high costs of reproducing copyrighted works. By the same token, today’s governments owe much of their authority to the high costs of changing jurisdictions. The technology of seasteading may change that by allowing “dynamic geography,” a situation in which any part of society is free to exit and take their homes and businesses with them. It may take many decades for this vision to be realized, if it can be realized at all. But it’s fun to see someone at least giving it a shot.

Chutzpah

Today’s Washington Times has a long interview with former House Majority Whip Tom DeLay in which he talks about the problems facing the Republican Party and his efforts to help rebuild it. As I have written, there is no doubt that the GOP is facing many problems today, many of them due to the big-government conservatism brought about in part by…Tom DeLay.

This is after all, the same Tom DeLay who:

  • Presided over an unprecedented spending binge by Congressional Republicans. In fact, DeLay was a cheerleader for using earmarks to buy votes for Republican candidates in competitive districts;
  • Twisted arms and threatened dissenters in order to pass the Medicare prescription drug benefit, the first new entitlement program in 40 years;
  • Helped sidetrack Social Security reform;
  • Helped start the “K Street Project,” a cynical exercise in vote buying that led to much of the corruption that plagued Republicans in recent years;
  • Once said that “there is simply no fat left to cut in the federal budget.”

If Republicans and/or conservatives really want to recapture their small government credentials, the might start by ignoring Tom DeLay.

A Free Market Gem in Guatemala

The L.A. Times has a very fine article today on Francisco Marroquín University, Guatemala’s libertarian institution of higher learning, and its founder, Manuel “Muso” Ayau.

Those of us who have visited UFM can testify as to the passion for liberty that fills the place. It’s certainly a free market gem in the midst of Central America.

Today, In the Role of David Brooks, Mike Huckabee

A few weeks back, David Brooks was telling George Packer that philosophies of limited government were “politically unpopular and fundamentally un-American.” Now we have Mike Huckabee telling the Huffington Post the same thing:

The greatest threat to classic Republicanism is not liberalism; it’s this new brand of libertarianism, which is social liberalism and economic conservatism, but it’s a heartless, callous, soulless type of economic conservatism because it says “look, we want to cut taxes and eliminate government. If it means that elderly people don’t get their Medicare drugs, so be it. If it means little kids go without education and healthcare, so be it.” Well, that might be a quote pure economic conservative message, but it’s not an American message. It doesn’t fly. People aren’t going to buy that, because that’s not the way we are as a people. That’s not historic Republicanism. Historic Republicanism does not hate government; it’s just there to be as little of it as there can be. But they also recognize that government has to be paid for.

If you have a breakdown in the social structure of a community, it’s going to result in a more costly government … police on the streets, prison beds, court costs, alcohol abuse centers, domestic violence shelters, all are very expensive. What’s the answer to that? Cut them out? Well, the libertarians say “yes, we shouldn’t be funding that stuff.” But what you’ve done then is exacerbate a serious problem in your community. You can take the cops off the streets and just quit funding prison beds. Are your neighborhoods safer? Is it a better place to live? The net result is you have now a bigger problem than you had before.

First, there’s nothing “new” about libertarianism, although it appears someone’s just alerted Mike Huckabee to the phenomenon. Second, this business of the “un-Americanism” of libertarianism is ahistorical, although not particularly surprising coming from a Know Nothing demagogue like Mike Huckabee. Someday, advertising one’s own ignorance about the world won’t be considered a mark in one’s favor by conservatives. Until then, Mike Huckabee.

Fiscal Responsibility, Bush Style

As we all know, if you just put the word “defense,” or “homeland” or “security” anywhere in the name of a government program, its fiscal impact is immediately zeroed out. But if this mystical transformation didn’t take place, President Bush’s fiscal legacy would be looking darker and darker each day. Noah Shachtman gives us a rundown:

The Pentagon’s internal watchdogs can’t keep up with the explosive growth in military spending. Which means $152 billion’s worth of contracts annually aren’t being reviewed for fraud, abuse and criminal interference by the Defense Department’s Inspector General, according to a newly-unearthed report to Congress. The result: “undetected or inadequately investigated criminal activity and significant financial loss,” as well as “personnel, facilities and assets [that] are more vulnerable to terrorist activities.”

Since fiscal year 2000, the military’s budget has essentially doubled, from less than $300 billion to more than $600 billion. Two wars have begun. But the number of criminal investigators and financial auditors at the Department of Defense Office of Inspector General (DoD IG) has stayed more or less the same. So there are now “gaps in coverage in important areas, such as major weapon systems acquisition, health care fraud, product substitution, and Defense intelligence agencies,” according to the report, obtained by the Project on Government Oversight.

[…]

The DOD IG’s office has certainly stayed busy. In just the last few months, the DOD IG caught a Philippine corporation bilking $100 million from the military health care system; nabbed a trio trying to bribe their way into drinking water contracts for troops; busted an Air Force general who tried to steer a $50 million deal to his buddies; and launched investigations into the Pentagon’s propaganda projects and the youthful arms-dealer who sold tens of millions of dollars’ worth of dud ammunition to the government.

Shachtman then observes: “The question is: How much more could they have done, with a bigger staff?” It’s almost like you sink a half a trillion dollars a year into one massive bureaucracy and it’s hard to keep track of it all. President McCain’s going to have to find a lot of earmarks to offset this sort of thing.

Justified Praise for Cult of the Presidency

Gene is too modest to link to it himself (I wouldn’t be!), but George Will’s column in this week’s Newsweek centers on Caesaropapism and, Gene Healy’s new book. Here are the first few paragraphs:

Barack Obama recently said, “I believe in our ability to perfect this nation.” Clearly there is something the candidate of “change” will not change—the pattern of extravagant presidential rhetoric. Obama is trying to replace a president who vowed to “rid the world of evil”—and of tyranny, too.

But then, rhetorical—and related—excesses are inherent in the modern presidency. This is so for reasons brilliantly explored in the year’s most pertinent and sobering public affairs book, “The Cult of the Presidency: America’s Dangerous Devotion to Executive Power,” by Gene Healy of Washington’s libertarian Cato Institute.

Healy’s dissection of the delusions of “redemption through presidential politics” comes at a moment when liberals, for reasons of liberalism, and conservatives, because they have forgotten their raison d’être, “agree on the boundless nature of presidential responsibility.” Liberals think boundless government is beneficent. Conservatives practice situational constitutionalism, favoring what Healy calls “Caesaropapism” as long as the Caesar-cum-Pope wields his anti constitutional powers in the service of things these faux conservatives favor.

“Faux conservatives” is just right. Elsewhere, Gene has demonstrated that conservatives have shamefully prostrated themselves at the totem of executive power, a position that would have nauseated their intellectual forebears.