Topic: Energy and Environment

Chu-ing up the Economy in the Name of Climate Change

USA Today reports on Obama DOE nominee Steven Chu:

The Nobel Prize winner nominated to head the Energy Department said Tuesday that he would focus the agency in part on global warming, a sharp departure from the agency’s priorities during the Bush administration.

Citing new evidence in the debate over the legitimacy of global warming, Senior Fellow in Environmental Studies Patrick J. Michaels explains scientific bias in his new book, Climate of Extremes: Global Warming Science They Don’t Want You to Know.

Watch Michaels discuss the possibility of a carbon tax on Fox Business and global warming on CNN’s Lou Dobbs.

Senior Fellows Jerry Taylor and Peter Van Doren examine the true cost of climate change and defend the case against government support for alternative energy.

Why Congress Should Turn Federal Lands into Fiduciary Trusts

The Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, and Fish and Wildlife Service collectively manage well over a quarter of the land in the United States. Several Cato Institute studies have called for privatization of these public lands, but this idea is strongly resisted by environmentalists, recreationists, and others. A new paper from Cato scholar Randal O’Toole suggests an alternative policy: turn them into fiduciary trusts. Under this proposal, the U.S. would retain title to the lands, but the rules under which they would be governed would be very different.

Government the Environmental Despoiler

The Washington Post editorialized today on an egregious environmental foul-up by the Tennessee Valley Authority:

“As bad as this disaster was, what made it worse was the revelation that such pools of pollutants aren’t federally regulated.” Efforts to regulate the problem have been “beaten back by industry” in the past, the Post says.

But, wait – the TVA is owned by the federal government. It’s a government entity, not part of private “industry.” So much for the notion that government organizations are good environmental stewards because they don’t have to grub for profits.

Certainly, the environmental problem described by the Post is a serious one. But let’s not frame this as Green Government vs. Dirty Private Industry. Indeed, the federal Department of Energy, for example, has had an atrocious environmental record over the decades.

PBS in Action

I got a fundraising letter at home, an all-green envelope with a silhouetted tree and the stark message:

This is no time to fool with our planet… AN URGENT OFFER INSIDE

An environmentalist organization, of course.

But not exactly. In fact, it was a fundraising letter from MPT, which did not quite tell me anywhere that that stands for Maryland Public Television, a television network owned and operated by the State of Maryland. The letter continued in that vein: “no time to take our planet for granted … understand the stakes … cannot afford a community and nation ignorant of science.” Sounds like Maryland Government Television knows which side is right in the heated scientific, economic, and political debates over environmental issues.

True, they do promise to use their “unique ability” to “bring our community real science with no political agenda, news reporting with diverse perspectives, and programs that teach kids conservation values.” But has anybody ever seen a PBS/MPT documentary on the high costs of environmental regulation? Or the fact that the globe hasn’t warmed for the past 10 years? Or the way that markets lead to better environmental amenities? Not really a lot of diverse perspectives, as the general tenor of the letter would suggest.

MPT’s fundraising letter seems to acknowledge clearly its function: To raise money from liberals, to supplement the tax money raised from people of all political perspectives, to advance one side of controversial issues. In a world of 500 channels, why are we taxing people to support one side in a broad political debate?

How Much Will Global Warming Cost Us?

A lot more than we used to think … or so we are told.  Turns out that the economists who study this matter are not so convinced.  Those interested in what the most recent literature review has to say on this topic should go here: http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=9850.  Short answer: If you believe the scientific narrative offered by the IPCC, we’re probably looking at the low-end of $3-$24 per ton of carbon emissions.

The Deadliest U.S. Natural Hazard: Extreme Cold

Reuters reports that:

Heat is more likely to kill an American than an earthquake, and thunderstorms kill more people than hurricanes do, according to a U.S. “death map” published on Tuesday…

Heat and drought caused 19.6 percent of total deaths from natural hazards, with summer thunderstorms causing 18.8 percent and winter weather causing 18.1 percent, the team at the University of South Carolina found.

However, the result that heat is the most deadly natural hazard seems to be an artifact of the data source employed by the authors of the so-called “death map.” Their primary data source is the National Climatic Data Center’s Storm Data. However, the NCDC data for mortality from extreme heat and cold is questionable.

As is evident from the paper, the authors are aware that mortality data for these two types of extreme events from NCDC are substantially different from mortality data from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) based on the Compressed Mortality File for the United States. The latter uses death certificate records, which provide the cause of each recorded death (based on medical opinion). I would contend that when it comes to cause of death, particularly for extreme cold and heat, medical opinion as captured in death certificate records is probably more reliable than determinations made by the meteorologists in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s NCDC.

The following table from Goklany (2007) provides a breakdown of mortality due to the major types of extreme weather events for 1979-2002 based on data from the CDC database for extreme cold and extreme heat, and various arms of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for floods, lightning, hurricanes, and tornadoes. It indicates that extreme cold, rather than heat, is the deadliest form of extreme weather event. In fact, over this period, extreme cold was responsible for slightly more than 50 percent of deaths during this period for the categories listed in the table.

Note that despite the hoopla about natural weather disasters, they contribute less than 0.06% to the annual U.S. death toll!

Moreover, as the following figure, also from Goklany (2007), shows, both US death and death rates from weather events are declining, despite any climate change, which we are assured can only make matters worse.

Finally, the Reuters report notes, “Researchers who compiled the county-by-county look at what natural disasters kill Americans said they hope their study will help emergency preparedness officials plan better.” [The study was apparently funded by the Department of Homeland Security.] As a taxpayer, I hope that emergency preparedness officials look beyond this study to identify and prepare for future emergencies, or they might miss out on the larger disasters, even as they prepare for lesser ones.