Topic: Cato Publications

UK National ID in Collapse - U.S. National ID to Follow?

The Sunday Times (U.K.) reports that “Tony Blair’s flagship identity cards scheme is set to fail and may not be introduced for a generation.” The Times cites leaked e-mails reflecting senior officials’ belief that the plan to subject the U.K. population to the regimentation of a national ID system is falling apart. Even a backup, scaled-down national ID card isn’t “remotely feasible,” according to the e-mails cited by the report. Ministers who are pressing ahead with the plan are “ignoring reality.”

Similar e-mails may well be floating around the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which will be issuing regulations to flesh out the REAL ID Act this summer this fall after November 7th. (No bureaucrat with an ounce of political acumen would drop a $9-billion-dollar unfunded surveillance-mandate before the mid-term election.)

This is not bad news. A national ID system is useful for controlling a law-abiding population, but not useful for securing against law-breakers, particularly committed threats like terrorists - unless it is part of a total surveillance system.

The failure to implement a national ID system in the U.S. would represent little loss to the nation in terms of security, and a substantial gain in terms of preserved freedom and autonomy. All this is discussed in my new book, Identity Crisis: How Identification is Overused and Misunderstood.

Unlike the U.K., where a national ID is apparently a project identified with Tony Blair, the Bush Administration does not have to look for a face-saving alternative. The U.S. national ID was not a Bush Administration project, but something it accepted in a political bargain. The Administration can now (rightly) declare it impossible to implement and inconsistent with American values, then work with Congress to repeal the REAL ID Act.

New at Cato Unbound: What to Do about Iran?

In this month’s Cato Unbound, “What to Do about Iran,” Reuel Marc Gerecht, resident fellow of the American Enterprise Institute and author of The Islamic Paradox, argues in a provocative new essay that diplomatic attempts keep Iran’s clerical regime from getting nuclear weapons will fail, so the U.S. must choose between preemptively bombing Iran’s nuclear facilities or allowing the mullahs to have the bomb. Arguing that the latter option “would empower its worst enemies in Tehran and spiritually invigorate all Muslim radicals who live on American weakness,” Gerecht advises the former: a policy of preemptively bombing Iran’s nuclear sites.

This week and next, a panel of defense strategy and foreign policy experts will challenge Gerecht’s argument, starting with Ted Galen Carpenter, vice president of defense and foreign policy studies at the Cato Institute, and followed by Edward N. Luttwak, senior fellow of the Center for Strategic and International Studies and author of widely discussed recent article in Commentary, “Three Reasons Not to Bomb Iran — Yet,” and Anthony H. Cordesman, Arleigh A. Burke Chair in Strategy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and author of Iran’s Developing Military Capabilities.

Is Gerecht right? Are all non-military approaches to the Iranian nuke bound to fail? If so, should the U.S. resign itself to a nuclear Iran and rely on deterrence as it did during the Cold War? Or is deterrence ill-suited to a regime run by religious extremists?

Stay tuned for incisive commentary and criticism by some of America’s leading defense policy thinkers.

Competitive Federalism Can Reform Health Insurance, Med Mal

In a previous post, I suggested that my brother and his family could save thousands on their health insurance if they moved in with his former college roommate’s family in Pennsylvania, rather than settle and buy coverage in New Jersey.

I thought that former roommate’s wife (Kristin, another college friend) would shoot me virtual daggers. Instead, she wrote:

Wow — guess we’re pretty lucky! Although, we can’t seem to keep our doctors here in PA due to high malpractice insurance costs. So maybe the best deal for everyone would be to buy their insurance in PA, then drive to NJ for their doctor’s appointments.

That’s one way to get around unwanted costs imposed by a state’s medical malpractice laws. In our book Healthy Competition, Mike Tanner and I suggest another: Let patients, doctors, hospitals, and insurers agree up front on the level of malpractice protection that patients receive.

 

You like caps on non-economic damages? Sign yourself right up. You want more malpractice protection than that? It might cost you more, but the choice is yours. The contracts that providers are willing to write could even tell patients something about the quality of care.

Patients can already choose a different level of malpractice protection by traveling out-of-state or out-of-country for treatment. Why not let them do so without leaving home?

Medicare Part D: Who Is the Main Constituency?

Watson Wyatt Worldwide has just released a survey showing – again – that Medicare Part D’s employer subsidies and the availability of the new stand-alone drug plans are bailing out employers who can no longer deliver on their promises to retirees:

Despite widespread use of the Medicare federal subsidy, a vast majority of employers are planning to curtail their retiree medical plans for current and future retirees in the next five years…

Fourteen percent of employers plan to eliminate the benefit entirely for future post-65 retirees and 6 percent plan to eliminate it for their current post-65 retirees…

The lesson from the Pension Benefits Guarantee Corporation and other corporate bailouts could not be more clear: if government lets corporations escape the costs of making promises they can’t keep, we’ll get more corporations making promises they can’t keep.

Health Care Provider Finds No Tragedy in This Commons

An article from the Minneapolis Star-Tribune on competition between physicians and nurse practitioners includes this endearing quote, which encapsulates how some providers see the U.S. health care sector:

The American Medical Association is against giving full autonomy to nurse practitioners, stating as its official policy position that a physician should be supervising nurse practitioners at all times and in all settings…

“There is an element within the physician community that gets a little antsy. … They think it’s going to take away revenue and business from them,” said Dr. Jan Towers, director of health policy for the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. “Really, there’s more than enough for everybody.”

Cue “We’re in the Money”….

For more, be sure to check out Medicare Meets Mephistopheles, to be released by the Cato Institute in September.

“Crisis of Abundance” Makes Executives’ Reading List

The leadership of the National Chamber Foundation (the educational arm of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce) recently recommended to its board of directors a list of 10 “Books that Drive the Debate.”  Among the recommended titles was Crisis of Abundance, a Cato Institute book by adjunct scholar Arnold Kling and the only health policy book to make the list. 

The foundation’s board is a bipartisan group of influential figures from the business, political, and policy spheres.  The NCF also plans to recommend the 10 titles to all Chamber of Commerce members.

The complete list is pasted below.  NCF chairman Bill Little told me today that Crisis of Abundance will be the first book they send out to their board members.

“Books that Drive the Debate”
NCF’s Top 10 Reading Selections

  1. Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global Economy by Moises Naim
  2. Three Billion New Capitalists: The Great Shift of Wealth and Power to the East by Clyde Prestowitz
  3. The Bottomless Well: The Twilight of Fuel, the Virtue of Waste, and Why We Will Never Run Out of Energy by Peter Huber and Mark Mills
  4. In Our Hands: A Plan to Replace the Welfare State by Charles Murray
  5. Our Brave New World by Charles Gave, Anatole Kaletsky, and Louis-Vincent Gave
  6. The Sarbanes-Oxley Debacle: What We’ve Learned; How to Fix It by Henry N. Butler
  7. An Army of Davids: How Markets and Technology Empower Ordinary People to Beat Big Media, Big Government, and Other Goliaths by Glenn Reynolds
  8. The Innovator’s Solution by Clayton Christensen and Michael Raynor
  9. Crisis of Abundance: Rethinking How We Pay for Health Care by Arnold Kling
  10. Education Myths What Special-Interest Groups Want You To Believe About Our Schools – And Why It Isn’t So by Jay P. Greene

(Another Cato connection: in March, the Cato Institute held a book forum for Glenn Reynolds’ An Army of Davids: How Markets and Technology Empower Ordinary People to Beat Big Media, Big Government, and Other Goliaths.)

The leadership of the NCF evidently agreed with Marginal Revolution publisher Tyler Cowen that Crisis of Abundance “is one of the most important books written on health care.”