Tag: war declaration

To (Ironically) Avoid Sequestration, Congress Could Declare War

The Senate is back in session this week as the battle over military spending, and the prospect of sequestration, continues to sizzle. Last Friday the Office of Management and Budget concluded  that war funding—also known as Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO)—would not be exempted from sequestration, contradicting the Pentagon’s earlier claims. Predictably, this has angered the GOP and provided fodder for those who oppose military spending cuts on any grounds.

But war funding—$88.5 billion for FY 2013—should never have been considered separate from military spending. This is a practice, gradually accepted in the past 10-15 years, that distorts the size of the defense budget, making it appear smaller. It provides the illusion that Congress and the current administration are fiscally responsible.

The irony of current flap over OMB’s ruling is that Congress could undo sequestration if it simply declared war. In today’s Cato podcast, Benjamin Friedman, research fellow for defense and homeland security studies, explains that the federal code, going back to the 1980s, holds that a declaration of war will reverse sequestration. But Congress doesn’t declare war anymore; members routinely ignore their constitutionally mandated obligation. Those who are the most vocal opponents of sequestration—Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon (R-CA) and others—have a tool at their disposal that they will never consider.

Listen to the podcast below to hear Friedman provide a primer on the battle over war funding (OCO), sequestration, and the defense budget bills.

Thursday Links

  • There is a growing gap between Washington policymakers, and the taxpayers and troops who fund and carry out those policies.
  • Why do budget and deficit hawks keep sidestepping growing entitlements?
  • Don’t forget to join us on Monday, March 28 at 1pm ET for a live video chat with Julian Sanchez on the growing surveillance state.
  • The individual mandate in Obamacare is another example of the growing congressional power under the Commerce Clause: