Tag: transportation security administration

On REAL ID, DHS Caves Once Again

After menacing states across the country this fall, the Department of Homeland Security has once again caved on threats to enforce REAL ID by denying Americans their right to travel.

This afternoon, DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson put out a press release backtracking on agency claims that the Transportation Security Administration would turn away air travelers from states that don’t comply with the U.S. national ID law in 2016.

The new deadline, according to Secretary Johnson’s statement, is January 22, 2018. That’s sure not 2016. That’s more than two years away.

REAL ID, Rumor Control, and You

The Identity Project says that a new DHS “Rumor Control” web page lies about the REAL ID Act. That may be true, but a lie is an intentional misstatement, and we don’t know if the PR professional who wrote the material on that page knows the issues or the law. Let’s review the record, taking each of the rumors DHS addresses in turn, so that the agency doesn’t misstate the federal government’s national ID policy in the future.

The U.S. Department of Chutzpah

For PR professionals, the holiday season is like one big Friday at 5:00 p.m. That’s when you release information that you don’t want getting too much attention.

So it’s no surprise that we learned yesterday that the Transportation Security Administration has just awarded itself the authority to make airport strip-search machines mandatory. Until now, having a machine create a digital representation of your unclothed body has had a happy alternative: a prison-style pat-down! (That’s my choice. It’s sometimes a little massage-y.)

It takes a lot of gall for the Department of Homeland Security to make this move now, though—not because it’s the holiday season, but because the DHS (of which TSA is a part) is currently under a court order to establish the legality of its strip-search machine policies in toto.

In July 2011, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the DHS had failed to follow the procedures required by law when it established its policy of using strip-search machines for primary screening. The court ordered the DHS to “promptly” undertake a notice-and-comment rulemaking. Four years later, our friends at the Competitive Enterprise Institute initiated a new lawsuit seeking to compel DHS to finish what was amounting to an endless rulemaking process.

DHS recently told the D.C. Circuit that it would finish the regulation by March 3, 2016. In the meantime, they’re screwing the lid down just a little bit more on air travelers. Chutzpah!

When the regulation is done, it can finally be challenged under the Administrative Procedure Act’s “arbitrary and capricious standard.” Our John Mueller and Mark Stewart have already shown that strip-search machines are a cost-ineffective security measure.

In a similar vein, rumors are swirling that the DHS will soon announce full REAL ID enforcement at airports. The quiet week between Christmas and New Years seems like a ripe time to get that news out.

They’ve said they’d give 120 days’ notice that TSA is going to start rejecting drivers’ licenses and IDs from states that don’t participate in the national ID system. A December announcement means that April would be white-knuckle time for travelers.

There will not be enforcement, of course. The goal is to bluff about enforcement to state legislatures in advance of their 2016 legislative sessions, so that they’ll pass laws implementing the federal national ID mandate. Just yesterday, two DHS bureaucrats issued orders to Minnesota governor Mark Dayton (D) detailing how the law in Minnesota must change to satisfy their demands.

Federal bureaucrats ordering around governors and legislators! Chutzpah!

DHS isn’t dumb enough to do it … I’m sometimes wrong … but actual REAL ID enforcement at airports would be quite a show. Not only would there be howls of protest aimed at TSA in the media, the DHS would catch a delicious lawsuit from some law-abiding American citizen trying to visit family who is denied the right to travel.

The lawsuit would expose that DHS enforcement is entirely arbitrary. REAL ID is unworkable, and the agency has been handing out waivers like they were candy canes since the statutory deadline in 2008. Having selected a pared-down “material compliance checklist” to treat as compliance, DHS bureaucrats have been arbitrarily claiming that some states are in compliance and some states are not, giving waivers to some states and not to others based on internal, self-selected criteria. That is not how law works, and once they try to enforce, they’ll have to square-up their enforcement efforts with the terms of the REAL ID law, equal protection, and due process.

Should DHS try to show that it has rational criteria for refusing IDs, that may bring in the question of ID security, which, like strip-search machines, is another cost-effectiveness loser. I won’t belabor that point, but my Christmas list includes a TSA and DHS operating under the rule of law, required to defend its programs in light of solid points made by security analysts like this guy Adam.

Learn more than you ever wanted to know about REAL ID from this recent Hill briefing.

Another Step toward Government Under Law

Last week, our friends at the Competitive Enterprise Institute won a small but important victory in the effort to bring the Transportation Security Administration under law. It began when the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) challenged the TSA’s policy of using strip-search machines at airports for primary screening. EPIC’s Fourth Amendment attack failed, but the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals found that the TSA hadn’t used required administrative procedures to establish the policy, and it ordered the agency to promulgate a rule after taking comments from the public.

That was more than four years ago. The agency has been dragging its feet. And last week the court gave TSA thirty days to submit a schedule for “the expeditious issuance of a final rule within a reasonable time.”

Once the TSA has finalized its rule, it will be subject to challenge under the “arbitrary and capricious” standard in federal administrative law. John Mueller, Mark Stewart, and I filed comments during the rulemaking that will help show that the TSA’s policy is incoherent when it’s before the court.

Yes, it’s taking a long time. Courts often defer to agencies as experts in the fields they regulate, though they’re really expert at gaming the regulatory system and the courts. With persistence, though, the effort to bring the TSA under law and reverse its needlessly invasive and expensive programs will bear fruit.

Or responsibility for air security will be restored to airlines and airports.

TSA’s Classified “Risk-Reduction Analysis”

Last month, our friends at the Competitive Enterprise Institute filed suit against the TSA because the agency failed to follow basic administrative procedures when it deployed its notorious “strip-search machines” for use in primary screening at our nation’s airports. Four years after being ordered to do so by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, TSA still hasn’t completed the process of taking comments from the public and finalizing a regulation setting this policy. Here’s hoping CEI’s effort helps make TSA obey the law.

The reason why federal law requires agencies to hear from the public is so that they can craft the best possible rules. Nobody believes in agency omniscience. Public input is essential to gathering the information for setting good policies.

But an agency can’t get good information if it doesn’t share the evidence, facts, and inferences that underlie its proposals and rules. That’s why this week I’ve sent TSA a request for mandatory declassification review relating to a study that it says supports its strip-search machine policy. The TSA is keeping its study secret.

In its woefully inadequate (and still unfinished) policy proposal on strip-search machines, TSA summarily asserted: “[R]isk reduction analysis shows that the chance of a successful terrorist attack on aviation targets generally decreases as TSA deploys AIT. However, the results of TSA’s risk-reduction analysis are classified.”

Two Years On, the TSA Is Still Not Subject to Law

Two years ago tomorrow, the Transportation Security Administration stopped accepting comments on its proposal to use “Advanced Imaging Technology” for primary screening at airports. The end of the comment period on nude body scanning would ordinarily promise the issuance of a final rule that incorporates knowledge gained by hearing from the public. But this is no ordinary rulemaking. This is an agency that does not follow the law.

It was almost four years ago that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ordered TSA to do a notice-and-comment rulemaking on its nude body scanning policy. Few rules “impose [as] directly and significantly upon so many members of the public,” the court said in ordering the agency to “promptly” publish its policy, take comments, and consider them in formalizing its rules.

Dear America, I Saw You Naked

Politico has a hilarious, revolting, and insightful article, written by former Transportation Security Administration screener Jason Edward Harrington. It’s called “Dear America, I Saw You Naked.” The subhead: “And yes, we were laughing.”

Many of the images we gawked at were of overweight people, their every fold and dimple on full awful display. Piercings of every kind were visible. Women who’d had mastectomies were easy to discern—their chests showed up on our screens as dull, pixelated regions. Hernias appeared as bulging, blistery growths in the crotch area. Passengers were often caught off-guard by the X-Ray scan and so materialized on-screen in ridiculous, blurred poses—mouths agape, à la Edvard Munch. One of us in the I.O. room would occasionally identify a passenger as female, only to have the officers out on the checkpoint floor radio back that it was actually a man. All the old, crass stereotypes about race and genitalia size thrived on our secure government radio channels.

In July 2011, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the TSA to conduct a formal rulemaking and take comments from the public on the use of strip-search machines at airports. TSA took 20 months to propose a two-sentence regulation, which, as we pointed out to the agency, is totally defective.

The comment period closed in June last year and we have waited another seven months, at this point, for a final rule. When it comes out, it can be challenged in court under the “arbitrary and capricious” standard of the Administrative Procedure Act.

The evidence in the rulemaking docket shows that strip-search machines cost more in dollars, privacy, and dignity than they provide in security, which, as Harrington’s article again shows, is not very much: “We knew the full-body scanners didn’t work before they were even installed.”

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