Tag: The Hill

Guess Who’s One of the Hill’s ‘100 People to Watch This Fall’

I guess I’ll have to tout this myself. Last week, the Hill newspaper put me on its list of “the 100 people you can’t ignore this fall if you’re wondering how events in Congress and the White House will play out.” Here’s the write-up

Michael Cannon Director of health policy studies at the Cato Institute
 
Think the Supreme Court has settled the question of ObamaCare’s legality? Not if Cannon has anything to say about it. Cannon is a tireless advocate for the argument that the IRS has illegally implemented the healthcare law’s insurance subsidies, which will help low-income households cover the cost of their premiums. 
 
His argument is that healthcare law, as written, does not allow for the subsidies to be used in healthcare marketplaces that are set up by the federal government.
 
He helped the state of Oklahoma file a lawsuit against the subsidies, and a group of small businesses filed a separate suit on the same grounds, in case Cannon’s runs into procedural roadblocks.
 
If the lawsuits Cannon has spearheaded are successful, they could have a devastating impact on the healthcare law. A final decision in favor would stop the flow of tax subsidies to people in more than half of the states, making ObamaCare far less attractive to consumers and stripping away much of the law’s promise of affordability.

Corrections and amplifications. The argument is as much Jonathan Adler’s as mine; we develop it together in this law-journal article. The argument is not that the IRS is illegally implementing otherwise lawful subsidies; it is that the IRS is trying to dispense some $700 billion in illegal subsidies that Congress expressly did not authorize, and impose illegal taxes on millions of employers and individual Americans starting in 2014; that the Obama administration is attempting to tax, borrow, and spend nearly $1 trillion without congressional authorization. Finally, I am neither a party nor counsel nor financier to either Pruitt v. Sebelius or Halbig v. Sebelius.

Max Baucus, ObamaCare’s Lead Author, Sees ‘Huge Train Wreck Coming Down’

I should probably just turn this one over to Sam Baker at The Hill:

Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.) said Wednesday he fears a “train wreck” as the Obama administration implements its signature healthcare law.

Baucus, the chairman of the powerful Finance Committee and a key architect of the healthcare law, said he’s afraid people do not understand how the law will work.

“I just see a huge train wreck coming down,” Baucus told Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius at a Wednesday hearing. “You and I have discussed this many times, and I don’t see any results yet.”

Baucus pressed Sebelius for details about how HHS will explain the law and raise awareness of its key provisions, which are supposed to take effect in just a matter of months.

“I’m very concerned that not enough is being done so far — very concerned,” Baucus said.

He pressed Sebelius to explain how her department will overcome entrenched misunderstandings about what the healthcare law does.

“Small businesses have no idea what to do, what to expect,” Baucus said.

Citing anecdotal evidence from small businesses in his home state, Baucus asked Sebelius for specifics about how it is measuring public understanding of the law.

“You need data. Do you have any data? You’ve never given me data. You only give me concepts, frankly,” Baucus told Sebelius.

Sebelius said the administration is not independently monitoring public awareness of specific provisions, but will be embarking on a substantial education campaign beginning this summer.

Baucus is facing a competitive reelection fight next year, and Republicans are sure to attack him over his role as the primary author of the healthcare law.

A messy rollout of the law’s major provisions, just months before Baucus faces voters, could feed into the GOP’s criticism.

Wednesday’s hearing wasn’t the first time Democrats — including Baucus — have raised concerns about the implementation effort. But while other lawmakers have toned down their public comments as they’ve gotten answers from Sebelius, Baucus said Sebelius has not addressed his fears.

“I’m going to keep on this until I feel a lot better about it,” Baucus told Sebelius…

Enrollment in the healthcare law’s insurance exchanges is slated to begin in October, for coverage that begins in January. Baucus, though, said he’s worried exchanges won’t be ready in time.

“For the marketplaces to work, people need to know about them,” Baucus said. “People need to know their options and how to enroll.”

Who knew that running the health care sector would be hard.

Cybersecurity Improves No Matter What Congress Does

The Hill’s “Hillicon Valley” blog reported late Wednesday that cybersecurity legislation was likely to fail in the Senate today.

The post, originally titled “Cybersecurity Act Expected to Crash and Burn in Senate,” indulged in some typical Washington, D.C. conceit: “The Senate’s cybersecurity bill is likely to go down in defeat on Thursday,” it said, “ending any hope of passing a measure by the end of the year to protect America’s networks.”

It is highly arguable, the question whether cybersecurity legislation would protect America’s networks. Doing so is the responsibility of the owners and operators of those networks (and all other communications and computing infrastructure). They are working all the time on protecting their assets, and their capacities to do so are constantly improving.

Yes, attacks on computing are improving, too, but there is little substantiated evidence (the fear-mongering of government officials and contractors is not substantiated) that the bad guys are getting the upper hand.

The Scylla and Charybdis Senate leaders appear to have been navigating was between a bill that was too regulatory, swamping American tech companies and “critical infrastructure” providers with deadening regulation, and, on the other hand, a bill that tapped too deeply into Americans’ communications and data. I’m happy—and feel quite safe—with cybersecurity legislation breaking up on the shoals or getting sucked down into a whirlpool, either one.

It’s possible, of course, that Senate leaders could arrive at a last-minute compromise—they’ll come forth extolling their own heroism for doing so. It’s very likely that the next Congress will return with undiminished hubris to the idea that the federal government can and should secure our computers, networks, and data. But it’s not true. That is the responsibility, and far more within the capability, of the private-sector owners of the nation’s digital infrastructure.

Nothing in this post should diminish the importance of cybersecurity. It is indeed hundreds or thousands of different problems that will be addressed by manifold actors various ways over coming decades. The government has a role in cybersecurity: getting and keeping its own house in order. But the majority of the problem is ours, not the government’s, and we are slowly, surely taking care of it.