Tag: tarren bragdon

Debating ObamaCare with Kathleen Sebelius

Back in October, I debated ObamaCare with former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius. Kansas City Public Television recently aired a package featuring the debate.

Complete footage of the debate is available here: Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4Part 5, and Part 6.

One memorable moment came after I told the story of Deamonte Driver, a boy from Prince George’s County, Maryland, who died at age 12 because his mother was unable to find a dentist who would accept their Medicaid coverage. An infection that began in an abscessed tooth spread to Deamonte’s brain and ultimately killed him. A dentist could have prevented Deamonte’s death with a simple $80 extraction. But Medicaid pays dentists so little, that only one in six Maryland dentists accepts Medicaid patients. Deamonte’s mother and employees at a local non-profit called dozens of dentists to no avail.

Deamonte DriverSebelius responded that Deamonte would have died with or without Medicaid, and besides there is no alternative because “I don’t know any dentists who take uninsured people at all.” This from, as KCPT describes her, “the woman once charged with leading the nation’s health care system.”

Also on the panel were Tarren Bragdon of the Foundation for Government Accountability and Daniel Landon of the Missouri Hospital Association.

Rick Scott’s ObamaCare Flip-Flop

Word is that Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) has decided to throw his support behind, or at least drop his opposition to, ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion. His formal announcement, which may come tomorrow, will receive much attention. Scott was an early opponent of ObamaCare. He parlayed that opposition into a bid for governor in 2010, and rode the anti-ObamaCare wave into office. Shortly after becoming governor, he announced he would not lift a finger to help the federal government implement the law. I followed all this pretty closely. I served on Scott’s gubernatorial transition team, at his invitation.

Now, it appears Scott doesn’t see the point in opposing the Medicaid expansion. Never mind that – according to my colleague Jagadeesh Gokhale, whom the Social Security Administration consults when making these types of projections – the expansion will cost Florida $20 billion over the first 10 years, and add 3 million Floridians to the Medicaid rolls. Never mind that many of those Floridians currently have private health insurance. Never mind that Medicaid will provide them inferior access to care. Never mind that expanding Medicaid would make those millions of voters dependent on government for their health care, and thus would expand the constituency for more government spending and higher taxes.

There is speculation that Scott made a deal with the Obama administration: he would drop his opposition to the Medicaid expansion in exchange for HHS approving Florida’s plan to put its Medicaid enrollees in managed care plans. HHS approved Florida’s plan today. But economists have shown that moving Medicaid enrollees into managed care increases state and federal spending because it lures more people into the program. So it appears that Scott supported ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion so that the Obama administration would support his.

Scott says he still opposes having Florida create a health insurance Exchange. Then again, he said the same thing about the Medicaid expansion. So in addition to whatever other damage his flip-flop does, he has squandered his credibility as an opponent of ObamaCare.

To reclaim any credibility on this issue, Scott would have to file an Oklahoma-style lawsuit to block the illegal taxes that the Obama administration is trying to impose on employers in Florida and the other 33 states that have opted for a federal Exchange. Or will he sell out Florida’s job creators too?