Tag: supreme court review

Cato’s Eternal Vigilance

Today is Constitution Day, when all educational institutions are supposed to teach something about our founding document and when all citizens should think about the liberty that is so precious, but that requires, as Jefferson said, eternal vigilance.  We at Cato celebrate Constitution Day with our annual symposium – this year held yesterday so as to accommodate Yom Kippur, which begins tonight – and by releasing the Cato Supreme Court Review, the nation’s first in-depth review of the Supreme Court term just ended.

We’ve now had nine such conferences – which take place about two and a half months after the previous term concludes and two weeks before the next one begins – and published nine such volumes.  We are proud of the speed with which we publish the Review – authors of articles about the last-decided cases have little more than a month to provide us full drafts – and of the tome’s accessibility, at least insofar as the Court’s opinions allow for that.  Both the book and the conference are intended for everyone from lawyers to educated laymen and interested citizens.

I hope that our Constitution Day event and the Review’s collection of essays will deepen and promote the Madisonian first principles of our Constitution, giving renewed voice to the Framers’ fervent wish that we have a government of laws and not of men.  In so doing, we hope also to do justice to a rich legal tradition in which judges, politicians, and ordinary citizens alike understood that the Constitution reflects and protects the natural rights to life, liberty, and property – including The Right to Earn a Living, to quote the title of a new book by my friend and Cato adjunct scholar Timothy Sandefur (for which we’re having a Hill briefing today and book forum Monday) – and serves as a bulwark against the abuse of government power.

In this uncertain time of individual mandates, endless “stimulus,” financial “reform,” and general overreach, it is more important than ever to remember our Constitution’s roots in the Enlightenment tradition.

First Amendment 1, Censorship 0

Today, we celebrate a free speech victory in the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York.  In the case of Fox Television v. Federal Communications Commission, the three-judge panel struck down the FCC’s indecency policy for being “unconstitutionally vague” and “creating a chilling effect that goes far beyond the fleeting expletives issue” (e.g., stray f-bombs) that was at the heart of this case.

The case was before the Second Circuit after it was remanded by the Supreme Court last year.  Cato adjunct scholar Robert Corn-Revere, acting in his capacity as partner at Davis Wright Tremaine, is lead counsel for co-petitioner CBS.  Bob wrote an article for last year’s Cato Supreme Court Review in which he characterized the case as the first act of many that will in the networks’ fight for free speech.  He also argued a related case before the Third Circuit in February.

It should go without saying that free speech is a bedrock principle of our nation. Unfortunately, it must indeed be said – over and over again – to the FCC and other governmental agencies who wish to quash speech for whatever purported and often arbitrary reasons.  It’s absurd to think that the foundation of the republic is so fragile that the American people must be protected from the random scatological references of Nicole Richie.

Congrats to Bob and the many lawyers on the case for their hard-fought victory today, and we wish them luck in their continuing fights for freedom of speech.

You can read the Second Circuit’s decision here.

Use Your Law Deferment to Work for Liberty!

Many law firms are asking their incoming first-year associates to defer their start dates (from a few months to a full year) and are offering stipends to these deferred associates to work at public interest organizations. Cato has been running a deferred associates program for the last few months and we are now extending it for as long as top-notch candidates want to ride out the economy with us.

The Cato Institute invites third-year law students and others facing firm deferrals to apply to work at our Center for Constitutional Studies. This is an opportunity to assist projects ranging from Supreme Court amicus briefs to policy papers to the Cato Supreme Court Review. Start and end dates are flexible. Interested students and graduates should email a cover letter, resume, transcript, and writing sample, along with any specific details of their deferment (timing, availability of stipend, etc.) to Jonathan Blanks at jblanks [at] cato [dot] org.

Please feel free to pass the above information to your friends and colleagues. For information on Cato’s programs for non-graduating students, contact Joey Coon at jcoon [at] cato [dot] org (jcoon [at] cato [dot] org.)

Cato Supreme Court Review on the Road

With last week’s Constitution Day conference behind us (watch it here) – and the release of the 2008-2009 Cato Supreme Court Review – I can finally escape the office where I’ve been holed up all summer.  Yes, it’s time to go on the road and talk about all these wonderful legal issues we’ve learned about over the past year, as well as previewing the new Supreme Court term.

To that end, below the jump is my fall speaking schedule so far.  All these events are sponsored by the Federalist Society (and in some cases co-sponsored by other organizations) and all are open to the public.

If you decide to attend one of the presentations after learning of it from this blog post, please feel free to drop me a line beforehand, and do introduce yourself after the event.

Sept. 24 at 11:50am - DePaul Law School, Chicago - Debate on the Second Amendment post-Heller

Sept. 24 at 4:30pm - Chicago-Kent School of Law - Panel on Rule of Law in Iraq

Sept. 29 at 5:00pm - University of Cincinnati Law School - Rule of Law and Economic Development

Sept. 30 at 12:00pm - Capital University Law School (Columbus, OH) - Review of October Term 2008/Preview of October Term 2009

Sept. 30 at 3:30pm -  Ohio Northern School of Law (Ada, OH) - Debate on Ricci and Affirmative Action in Employment

Oct. 1 at 12:00pm - University of Toledo Law School - Debate on Ricci and Affrimative Action in Employment

Oct. 1 at 5:00pm - Thomas M. Cooley Law School (Auburn Hills, MI) - Immigration and the Constitution

Oct. 5 at 12:00pm - University of Pennsylvania Law School - Debate on the Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Interpretation

Oct.6 at 5:30pm - Blank Rome LLP in Philadelphia (Federalist Society Lawyers Chapter; small admission fee) - Panel on Rule of Law in Iraq

Oct. 8 at 1:00pm - Penn State-Dickinson Law School (University Park) - October Term 2009 Preview

Oct. 13 at 5:15pm - George Mason University Law School (Arlington, VA) - October Term 2009 Preview

Oct. 26 at 12:00pm - Florida International University Law School (Miami) - Topic TBA

Oct. 27 at 12:30pm - University of Miami Law School - Topic TBA