Tag: satire

In Defense of Truthiness

If you only read one Cato brief this Supreme Court term, it should be this one.

Believe it or not, it’s illegal in Ohio to lie about politicians, for politicians to lie about other politicians, or for politicians to lie about themselves. That is, it violates an election law—this isn’t anything related to slander or libel, which has higher standards of proof for public figures—to make “false statements” in campaign-related contexts.

During the 2010 House Elections, a pro-life advocacy group called the Susan B. Anthony List (SBA List), published ads in Ohio claiming that then-Rep. Steven Driehaus, who was running for re-election, had voted to fund abortions with federal money (because he had voted for Obamacare). Rather than contesting the truth of these claims in the court of public opinion, Driehaus filed a complaint with the Ohio Election Commission (OEC) under a state law that makes it a crime to “disseminate a false statement concerning a candidate, either knowing the same to be false or with reckless disregard of whether it was false.”

While the complaint was ultimately dropped, the SBA List took Driehaus and the OEC to federal court, seeking to have this law declared unconstitutional and thus enable advocacy groups to have more freedom going forward. The case has now reached the Supreme Court.

Joined by legendary satirist (and Cato’s H.L. Mencken Research Fellow) P.J. O’Rourke, our brief supports the SBA List and reminds the Court of the important role that “truthiness”—facts you feel you in heart, not in your head—plays in American politics, and the importance of satire and spin more broadly. We ask the Court a simple yet profound question: Doesn’t the First Amendment’s guarantee of free speech protect one man’s truth even if it happens to be another man’s lie? And who’s to judge—and on what scale—when a statement slides “too far” into the realm of falsehood?

However well intentioned Ohio legislators may have been, laws that criminalize “false” speech don’t replace truthiness and snark with high-minded ideas and “just the facts.” Instead, they chill speech, replacing the sort of vigorous political dialogue that’s at the core of the democratic process with silence. The Supreme Court of all institutions should understand that just because a statement isn’t fully true, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have its place in public discourse. Moreover, pundits and satirists are much-better placed to evaluate and send-up half-truths than government agencies.

The Supreme Court will hear argument in Susan B. Anthony List v. Driehaus on April 22.

Obamacare Rethink Maybe

Right before leaving town for the summer, the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 that “Rethink Maybe” was the pop hit of the summer, overtaking last year’s remake of “Every Breath You Take”:

Rethink Maybe

I filed a brief with the Court,
Don’t worry, it’s rather short
Constitution and not tort,
But now you’re in my way

I’d trade my soul for a wish,
Limited powers it is
Nobody expected this,
But now you’re in my way

Blue-eyed stare was holdin’,
Black-robed, balls-strikes callin’
Then you started cavin’
Where you think you’re goin’, CJ?

Hey, John Roberts,
This is crazy,
Mandates aren’t taxes,
So rethink, maybe?

It’s hard to look right,
At you CJ,
Your op makes no sense,
So rethink, maybe?

I just read you,
The ruling’s crazy,
Read Article I,
And rethink, maybe?

The other justices,
Ruled on the law,
But you played politics,
So rethink, maybe?

You thought Congress was remiss,
But changed your mind after this
You gave me the Commerce Clause,
But still, you’re in my way

I beg, and argue and plead
Had foresight, reason indeed
I didn’t know how I’d feel,
But now it’s in my way

Blue-eyed stare was holdin’,
Black-robed, balls-strikes callin’
Then you started cavin’
Where you think you’re goin’, CJ?

It’s hard to look right,
At you CJ,
Your op makes no sense,
So rethink, maybe?

Hey, John Roberts,
This is crazy,
Mandates aren’t taxes,
So rethink, maybe?

It’s hard to look right,
At you CJ,
Your op makes no sense,
So rethink, maybe?

All other justices,
Ruled on the law,
Mandates aren’t taxes,
So rethink, maybe?

When you came onto the Court
I thought you so rad
My man-crush so bad
My man-crush so, so bad

Now thanks to you I’ll pay this tax
It made me so mad
But now I’m just sad
It makes me so, so sad

It’s hard to look right,
At you CJ,
Mandates aren’t taxes,
So rethink, maybe?

I just read you,
The ruling’s crazy,
Read Article I,
And rethink, maybe?

The other justices,
Ruled on the law,
But you played politics,
So rethink, maybe?

When you came onto the Court
I thought you so rad
My man-crush so bad
My man-crush so, so bad

Now thanks to you I’ll pay this tax
It makes me so sad
And you should know that

So rethink, maybe?

Amusing, but Tragically Accurate, Video on Ag Subsidies from the U.K.’s Taxpayers Alliance

It is unclear whether European Union agriculture policy is more absurd or less absurd than American agriculture policy. Both systems reward special interests. Both systems distort markets. Both systems deprive people in the developing world. Both systems are bad news for taxpayers. The real issue is whether it is possible to reverse these terrible policies. Maybe a bit of satire will do the trick. Our friends at the Taxpayers Alliance in England have put together a video which uses humor to explain the absurdity of Europe’s so-called common agricultural policy.

After watching this video, I’m feeling a bit envious. My mini-documentaries on economic issues (see examples here, here, and here) have received some good feedback, but perhaps we could change more minds in America by using mockery instead of wonkery.