Tag: regulation

Economic Lessons from Obituaries

Where is the best place in the newspaper to learn about how the economy works?

In today’s Washington Post the business section has the usual stories about Ben Bernanke’s manipulations, government debt, and regulatory issues. But there is little on the innovation and dynamism that is at the heart of long-run economic growth.

It is entrepreneurs who create growth, and they are often best covered in the obituary section of the paper. Today the WaPo has a Bloomberg story about the passing of Albert Ueltschi, “who founded aviation-training company FlightSafety in 1951 [and] expanded it into an international powerhouse.”

Here are a few highlights:

As pilot of Pan American’s first corporate plane … Ueltschi hit upon the idea of opening a testing and training center for the booming aviation industry in the 1950s.

That company today is FlightSafety International Inc., which bills itself as the world’s leading aviation-training company, teaching pilots, aviation mechanics, flight attendants, dispatchers and others each year.

After graduating from high school in 1934, he opened a hamburger stand and used the proceeds to take flying lessons. A year later he borrowed $3,500 to buy an open-cockpit bi-wing airplane, the Waco 10, and made it his next business venture. “I took people up for a dollar a hop, gave lessons, and even put on air shows.”

[I]n 1951, Ueltschi borrowed $15,000 by mortgaging his house and opened FlightSafety at LaGuardia’s Marine Air Terminal.

In subsequent years, Mr. Ueltschi worked his tail off juggling two jobs and building what would become a multibillion part of the U.S. economy. The government did not build FlightSafety. Nor did the government build the thousands of other firms and industries that comprise the bulk of the U.S. economy, such as the electric guitar industry, as I discuss here.

To revive the economy, we need fewer central planners like Ben Bernanke and more decentralized business-builders like Albert Ueltschi. We need more firms like FlightSafety and less like Solyndra. Both candidates for president are promising to create jobs, but what we really need is for the government to get out of way of the people who create companies and industries.

A Few Notes:

Here’s a brief history of FlightSafety and pilot training. As in some other tech industries, it appears that the government helped to boost the demand for this industry’s services. But the basic innovations and advancements were made by gutsy individuals taking risks in the marketplace.

A final note is that the Washington Post does run some articles on live entrepreneurs, not just deceased ones. For example, Thomas Heath’s column is often very interesting and inspiring.

House Committee Threatens to Subpoena Documents Related to IRS’s Illegal ObamaCare Taxes

Last Friday, House Oversight Committee chairman Darrell Issa (R-CA) and colleagues sent a letter to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Douglas Shulman accusing Treasury of “either willfully misleading the Committee or…purposefully withholding information that is essential to the Committee’s oversight effort.”

As Jonathan Adler and I document in our forthcoming Health Matrix article, “Taxation Without Representation: The Illegal IRS Rule to Expand Tax Credits Under the PPACA,” the IRS has announced it will impose ObamaCare’s taxes on employers and individuals whom Congress expressly exempted from those taxes, and will send potentially hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars to private health insurance companies, also contrary to the plain language of the statute. Oklahoma attorney general Scott Pruitt has filed a legal challenge to the IRS rule that imposes those illegal taxes.

On August 20, the committee sent IRS commissioner Shulman a letter requesting “all legal analysis, internal or external, conducted by the IRS which authorizes IRS to grant premium-assistance tax credits in federal Exchanges,” and “all documents and communications between IRS employees and employees of the White House Executive Office of the President or any other federal agency or department referring or relating to the proposed IRS rule or final IRS rule.”

When Treasury responded for the IRS on October 12, according to committee member Rep. Scott DesJarlais (R-TN), it “failed to include a single document, memorandum, communication, or email created before the publication of the proposed rule on August 17, 2011”—i.e., when all the interesting discussions would have occurred. The committee’s second letter complains, “Treasury did not provide a single piece of evidence to support its claim that IRS complied with the standard process when issuing this rule.”

Thus, the committee threatened, “If you do not provide all of the requested information by Thursday, October 25, 2012, the Committee will consider the use of compulsory process.” Developing…

For more on this issue, see here, herehere, here, here, here, and here.

‘ObamaCare Has Huge Drawbacks that Outweigh Its Plausible Benefits’

Bob Samuelson:

The argument about Obamacare is often framed as a moral issue. It’s the caring and compassionate against the cruel and heartless. That’s the rhetoric; the reality is different. Many of us who oppose Obamacare don’t do so because we enjoy seeing people suffer. We believe that, in an ideal world, everyone would have insurance. But we also think that Obamacare has huge drawbacks that outweigh its plausible benefits.

It creates powerful pressures against companies hiring full-time workers — precisely the wrong approach after the worst economic slump since the Depression. There will be more bewildering regulations, more regulatory uncertainties, more unintended side effects and more disappointments. A costly and opaque system will become more so.

Read the whole thing.

21st Century U.S. Trade Policy Should be Pro-Market, not Pro-Business, Pro-Labor, or Pro-Lobbyist

The difference between the trade policy we have today and the trade policy we should have is like the difference between crony capitalism and free-market capitalism. The sausage grinder that is U.S. trade policy serves politicians and rewards lobbyists and gate-keeper bureaucrats, who have the gall to presume entitlement to limiting Americans’ options and picking winners and losers.

In a country that exalts freedom, the default trade policy should be free trade. But it’s not. Why?

The public has been trained to accept that special interests—companies seeking exemptions from competition; unions demanding that citizens ”Buy American”; investors and intellectual property holders demanding the U.S. public assume part of its business risks; enviros insisting on measures that punish developing countries for being poor—are rightly entitled to negotiate, abridge, impair, or sacrifice those freedoms in the name of Team USA.

So how are we free if decisions about how, with whom, and how much we transact with foreigners are decided by parties in Washington, who profit from denying us that freedom?

Trade policy should be about maximizing the freedom of Americans to choose, and distinctly not about bestowing certain advantages on particular companies, industries, or special interests. Trade policy should be about maximizing opportunities for Americans as consumers, workers, and investors, and not about impeding those opportunities.

In a globalized world where businesses are mobile and, ultimately, untethered to a homeland, what is the point of policymakers going to bat for U.S. producers? Usually, policies adopted to assist particular companies or industries handicap or subvert companies and industries upstream or downstream in the supply chain, or in other sectors. What even defines a U.S. producer anymore? GM builds more vehicles in China than it does in the United States.  Should Washington and Beijing both claim GM as national treasures and craft policy to serve its needs?

No. Policy should be neutral with respect to the goals of particular companies and industries, and designed to attract investment and human capital, and to maximize opportunities for Americans to partake of the global economy. Trade policy should be about ensuring certainty and eliminating policy-induced frictions in supply chains. As I wrote in this article (21st Century Economy Deserves Better Than 16th Century Trade Policies), which expounds upon the thoughts in this post:

This 21st century economic reality demands better than trade policies rooted in 16th century mercantilist dogma. It demands policies that are welcoming of imports and foreign investment, and that minimise regulations or administrative frictions that are based on misconceptions about some vague or ill-defined “national interest”.

Cato Files Brief in the First Federal Appeal Regarding the Contraception Mandate

In January, when the Department of Health and Human Services announced that qualifying health insurance plans under Obamacare would have to cover contraceptives and “morning after” pills, many religious institutions — most notably the Catholic Church — vehemently objected to being forced to fund health care that violates their religious beliefs.

More than 30 lawsuits challenging the contraceptive mandate have now been filed across the country by various individuals and religious institutions.  Two of those suits have now been consolidated for the first appellate argument on the issue: one brought by Wheaton College, a Christian liberal arts college in Wheaton, Illinois, and another brought by Belmont Abbey College, a North Carolina college based around a Benedictine abbey.

The legal point here is somewhat technical, but incredibly important for anyone who thinks his freedom of conscience may be violated by the government in the future (a category that includes essentially everyone).  As originally promulgated, the contraception mandate included a narrow exemption for religious institutions, one that wasn’t available to religiously affiliated colleges.  After the strong backlash against the mandate, HHS issued a “safe harbor statement,” saying that the government wouldn’t enforce the mandate for one year against certain non-profit organizations religiously opposed to covering contraception. 

In other words, the contraception mandate is still in place but just won’t be enforced — but only for a year and individuals are still free to sue to enforce it against their religiously opposed employers.  HHS also issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that announced the department’s consideration of more permanent methods of accommodating religious institutions.

Because of the safe harbor notice and the ANPRM, the district court dismissed the colleges’ lawsuits for lack of standing and ripeness — holding that the colleges aren’t currently suffering any injury and it was too early to challenge the proposed rule.  Now at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit – considered to be the second-most important federal court because of its role in reviewing executive branch actions – the colleges argue that they are in fact suffering a current injury and that the mere possibility of a future rule that may accommodate them in some way is too remote to terminate their case.

Last Friday, Cato joined the Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence and the American Civil Rights Union in filing an amicus brief supporting the colleges.  We argue that the trial court misapplied the constitutional test for standing by not focusing on the facts that existed at the outset of the case; subsequent government actions, such as the ANPRM, are irrelevant to the preliminary question of standing.  We also argue that the trial court’s ruling compromises the principle of separation of powers by giving the executive branch the power to strip a court of jurisdiction merely by issuing a safe harbor pronouncement and an ANPRM (which doesn’t legally bind an agency to act in any way).

It is thus entirely speculative whether the agency will alleviate the harms that the colleges are suffering.  Without intervention from the courts, therefore, the colleges are left in legal limbo while facing immediate and undeniable harms to their religious freedom:  On one hand, they can’t challenge the constitutionality of a final regulation. On the other, they can’t very well rely on a proposed regulatory amendment that may be offered at some unknown point in the future.

The trial court rulings in the Wheaton College and Belmont Abbey College cases are frightening examples of judicial abdication that permit the expansion of executive power far beyond its constitutional limits.  The D.C. Circuit will hear argument in these consolidated cases later this fall.

‘The Obamacare Cases Keep Coming’

Jonathan Adler at National Review Online:

During oral arguments in the Supreme Court challenge to the individual mandate, NFIB v. Sebelius, the plaintiff’s lawyer Paul Clement warned the justices not to make the same mistake they made in the 1970s with Buckley v. Valeo. In Buckley, the Court upheld portions of the post-Watergate campaign-finance reforms while invalidating others. The result was a muddled statute that Congress and the courts would repeatedly revisit for years to come. Repeating this approach with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Clement cautioned, could produce similar undesirable results. It’s too soon to know how quickly Congress will revisit the PPACA, but Clement’s warning already seems to be coming true in the courts…

More than three months after the Court’s decision, over three dozen legal challenges to the PPACA or its implementation are pending in federal courts, and more are sure to come.

At a Cato briefing on Capitol Hill this Wednesday, Adler and I will be speaking about one of those cases.

D.C. Employers: ObamaCare ‘Exchange’ an ‘Undefined, Untested, More Expensive Entity’ Offering ‘Standardized, Cookie-Cutter Coverage’

More than 150 local employers have written a letter to the District’s ObamaCare board, protesting the destruction of D.C.’s individual and small-group health insurance markets:

Those of us who may have had doubts about the health reform law were comforted by President Obama’s repeated assurances that, “If you like your health plan…you will be able to keep your health care plan. Period.” But, by dismantling and recasting the separate health insurance marketplaces that serve small employer groups and individuals in the District, D.C. policymakers would take away the option of keeping the health plan that they now have. Rather, to continue to offer health benefits to employees after 2013, small employers like us would have no choice but to go to an undefined, untested, more expensive entity to obtain coverage. Especially in these uncertain economic times, many employers, and their workers, must be given the time to adjust their budgets for the estimated price increases of the Exchange. In addition, many of us have long-established relationships with health insurers we know and are guided by broker advisors who understand our unique needs. We do not want to be forced to buy the standardized, cookie-cutter coverage that would be offered through a government-run Exchange…

Indeed, forcing all consumers seeking Individual or Small Group health coverage to go to the Exchange to purchase health plans runs counter to the ACA’s essential promise of more – not less – choice…The diversity of small employer health plans currently available in the District cannot be replicated in the standardized plans offered by the Exchange. Small employers rely on choice amongst a wide array of health plans available in the current commercial marketplace and the flexibility to design contributions to complement each employer’s unique budgetary and financial situations…With the many changes that will be required of employers of all sizes under the new federal health care reform law, it seems unreasonable to add to those concerns by eliminating the commercial marketplace which we know for an undefined, unfamiliar and untested Exchange-driven marketplace.

In addition, we cannot ignore the significant costs of administering the Exchange which will undermine one of the key goals of the federal law - affordability.

Signatories include such notorious right-wing groups as the Brady Center To Prevent Gun Violence:

  1. ACDI/VOCA
  2. AIDS United
  3. Allen & Associates
  4. Alliance Insurance Services
  5. American Academy of Orthotists & Prosthetists
  6. American Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc.
  7. American Bakers Association
  8. American Cleaning Institute
  9. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
  10. American Immigration Lawyers Association
  11. American Insurance Association
  12. American Road & Transportation Builders Association
  13. American Society of Association Executives
  14. Andre Chreky, the salon spa
  15. Apartment and Office Building Association of Metropolitan Washington
  16. Ashcraft & Gerel LLP
  17. Association for Competitive Technology
  18. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology
  19. Axar Management
  20. Beacon Consulting Group, Inc.
  21. Blue House Design
  22. Bogart
  23. Brady Campaign and Brady Center To Prevent Gun Violence
  24. Brawner Management, LLC
  25. Building Owners and Managers Association International
  26. Capital Medical Associates
  27. Center for Constitutional Litigation, P.C.
  28. Center for Nonprofit Advancement
  29. CGH Technologies, Inc.
  30. Chef Geoff’s
  31. Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind
  32. Combined Properties, Incorporated
  33. Communications Development
  34. Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area
  35. David All Group
  36. DC Chamber of Commerce
  37. Development Gateway, Inc.
  38. Distilled Spirits Council
  39. Elizabeth M. Ross and Kenneth M.H. Lee, M.D., P.C.
  40. Entertainment Software Association
  41. Environmental Law Institute
  42. EOP Group, Inc.
  43. Euroconsultants, Inc.
  44. Federation of American Hospitals
  45. Good Neighbors, LLC
  46. Government Accountability Project
  47. Hemsley Fraser Group
  48. High Noon Communications
  49. History Matters
  50. Howard Eales, Inc.
  51. Howard W. Phillips & Co.
  52. ICI Mutual Insurance Company
  53. Innovators Network Foundation
  54. Interstate Natural Gas Association of America
  55. J. Todd Miller & Associates, Inc.
  56. Kaludis Consulting Group, Inc.
  57. Katz, Marshall & Banks LLP
  58. Knightsbridge Restaurant Group
  59. LEVICK
  60. LimeLeap Solutions
  61. Marvin A. Address & Associates, Inc.
  62. McBride Real Estate
  63. McClendon Center
  64. MCLA Inc.
  65. Metro TeenAIDS
  66. Metropolitan Washington Road & Transportation Builders
  67. Miller & Shook Companies
  68. National Association for Gifted Children
  69. National Association of Health Underwriters
  70. National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners
  71. National Association of State Departments of Agriculture
  72. National Council for Interior Design Qualification
  73. National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Association
  74. National Mining Association
  75. National Propane Gas Association
  76. Navista, Inc.
  77. NetChoice
  78. Pacific Cargoes
  79. Park Limited
  80. Passion Food Hospitality
  81. Promundo-US
  82. Radio Television Digital News Association / Foundation
  83. Regis & Asociates, PC
  84. Reiter & Hill
  85. Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington
  86. RULG-Ukranian Legal Group, P.A.
  87. Sabin Vaccine Institute
  88. Society of Chemical Manufacturers & Affiliates
  89. Spiegel & McDiarmid LLP
  90. The Council for Responsible Nutrition
  91. The Episcopal Center for Children
  92. The Farm Credit Council
  93. The Ford Agency, Inc.
  94. The Gabriel Company, LLC
  95. The Prime Rib, Inc.
  96. Timothy A. Price, MD, PC
  97. Triad Communication / TRC Real Estate
  98. U.S. Grains Council
  99. U.S. Soccer Foundation
  100. United Fresh Produce Association
  101. Vinyl Siding Institute, Inc.
  102. Vogel, Slade & Goldstein, LLP
  103. Waterman and Associates
  104. Wenderoth, Lind & Ponack, L.L.P.
  105. Widmeyer Communications
  106. Appleseed Foundation
  107. Atelier Architects
  108. Bockorny Group
  109. Bond & Pecaro
  110. Bonner, Kiernan, Trebach & Crociata
  111. Bonstra Haresign Architects
  112. Capitol Process Services, Inc.
  113. Carr Workplaces
  114. Casey Trees
  115. Clement’s Pastry Shop
  116. Communications Development Incorporated
  117. Computer World Services
  118. Colonnade Condos
  119. Compressus
  120. Environmental Design & Construction
  121. The Fund for American Studies
  122. Fund for Global Human Rights
  123. Futures Industry Association
  124. Hartman-Cox Architects
  125. Hecht, Spencer and Associates
  126. The Herald Group
  127. I. Gorman Jewelers
  128. International Center for Research on Women
  129. International Dairy Foods Association
  130. International Franchise Association
  131. James E. Brown & Associates, PLLC
  132. Jewish Primary Day School of the Nation’s Capital
  133. Jewish Women International
  134. King Branson LLC
  135. Land Trust Alliance
  136. Law Resources
  137. MAG America
  138. Man-Machine Systems Assessment, Inc.
  139. McBee Strategic
  140. McBride Real Estate Services
  141. Medical Device Manufacturers Association
  142. Medical Society of the District of Columbia
  143. Metropolitan Engineering, Inc. | Shapiro – O’Brien
  144. National Institute of Building Sciences
  145. North American Millers’ Association
  146. North American Securities Administrators Association
  147. Pascal & Weiss, P.C.
  148. Poker Players Alliance
  149. Potomac Communications Group, Inc.
  150. Public Properties
  151. Rust Insurance Agency, LLC
  152. Safety Net Hospitals for Pharmaceutical Access
  153. Salsa Labs
  154. Society of the Plastics Industry
  155. Springboard Enterprises
  156. Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership
  157. The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars
  158. Washington Partners, LLC

One might add the Center for Science in the Public Interest, whose president emeritus complains, “the only option the board publicly considered has been this unpopular and unnecessary plan to close the private marketplace to many businesses.”