Tag: real id

DHS Lies, State Power Dies

The National Conference of State Legislatures recently held a briefing on REAL ID, the U.S. national ID law, for state legislators that is both fascinating and strange. It is fascinating to see Department of Homeland Security officials prevaricate so openly before state officials about what this national ID law does. And it is strange to see the National Conference of State Legislatures, a group that nominally represents the interests of states, working with the federal government to erode state power.

DHS officials evidently see it as a priority to avoid the impression that REAL ID compliance creates a national identification system. DHS’s PowerPoint presentation to NCSL, echoed in the oral briefing, insists that REAL ID “[d]oes not create a national ID card, a Federal database of driver information, or new Federal access to state data.”

On REAL ID, DHS Caves Once Again

After menacing states across the country this fall, the Department of Homeland Security has once again caved on threats to enforce REAL ID by denying Americans their right to travel.

This afternoon, DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson put out a press release backtracking on agency claims that the Transportation Security Administration would turn away air travelers from states that don’t comply with the U.S. national ID law in 2016.

The new deadline, according to Secretary Johnson’s statement, is January 22, 2018. That’s sure not 2016. That’s more than two years away.

Minnesota to Become a National ID State?

When Congress passed the REAL ID Act, it hadn’t held a hearing to examine the merits and demerits—or practicalities—of instituting a U.S. national ID. Unworkable, the Chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee called it. In the U.S. House, REAL ID was attached to a must-pass military spending bill after the House vote on that bill. REAL ID wasn’t a shining example of democratic deliberation.

But REAL ID requires state cooperation. States must convert their driver licensing bureaus into arms of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This means that states may deliberate openly about whether databases of information about their residents should be poured into a national ID system. (This is a clear requirement from the statute. States that commit to REAL ID compliance now eventually must “[p]rovide electronic access to all other States to information contained in the motor vehicle database of the State.”)

Minnesota is a state where Department of Homeland Security bureaucrats have recently pressured elected officials to fall in line. And in Minnesota today a “Legislative Working Group on Real ID Compliance” will meet to discuss “possible compliance measures.” The chair of the group is Rep. Peggy Scott (R) and the alternate chair is Sen. Scott Dibble (DFL).

Now, the Minnesota legislature is moving pretty fast. Their governor appears to have been successfully buffaloed by the Department of Homeland Security. But at least there is an open meeting that Minnesotans and interested advocates can attend to inform the legislature.

So now the question can be joined: Will Minnesota’s elected officials put the state’s residents into a national ID system?

The web page on which this meeting is listed appears as though it will change. Other members of Minnesota’s “Legislative Working Group on REAL ID Compliance”—folks who will have a big say on whether Minnesota becomes a national ID state—are listed below.

REAL ID, Rumor Control, and You

The Identity Project says that a new DHS “Rumor Control” web page lies about the REAL ID Act. That may be true, but a lie is an intentional misstatement, and we don’t know if the PR professional who wrote the material on that page knows the issues or the law. Let’s review the record, taking each of the rumors DHS addresses in turn, so that the agency doesn’t misstate the federal government’s national ID policy in the future.

What Is Real REAL ID Compliance?

This fall, the Department of Homeland Security and its pro-national ID allies staged a push to move more states toward complying with REAL ID, the U.S. national ID law. The public agitation effort was so successful that passport offices in New Mexico were swamped with people fearing their drivers’ licenses would be invalid for federal purposes. A DHS official had to backtrack on a widely reported January 2016 deadline for state compliance.

DHS continues to imply that all but a few holdout states stand in the way of nationwide REAL ID compliance. The suggestion is that residents of recalcitrant jurisdictions will be hung out to dry soon, when the Transportation Security Administration starts turning away travelers who arrive at its airport checkpoints with IDs from non-compliant states.

They Represent D.C. in New Mexico

In a recent The Hill piece on the REAL ID debate in New Hampshire, I wrote about the complaint against federal legislators who cease representing their states in Washington, D.C., and start representing Washington, D.C., in their states.

That seems to be happening in New Mexico, where four of five members of the congressional delegation are at best standing by worrying about a Department of Homeland Security attack on their state. At worst, they are lobbying the state legislature to cede authority over driver licensing to the federal government.

The DHS is pushing New Mexico toward compliance with REAL ID, the national ID law, by saying that it will not offer another extension of the deadline for compliance. The statutory deadline passed seven years ago and no state is in compliance. No state will be in 2016. The national ID law is as unworkable as it is weak as a security tool.

Setting the REAL ID Record Straight in Minnesota

A few weeks ago, unsatisfied with a report on REAL ID in the Minneapolis Star Tribune, I submitted an op-ed that the paper was kind enough to print. Unfortunately, they followed it up with an editorial favoring state compliance with REAL ID. And last week, the Star Tribune published an op-ed from a pro-national-ID advocacy group arguing that Minnesota should join the national ID system. The paper’s recent coverage of a meeting between state officials and the DHS reported uncritically on federal bureaucrats’ misrepresentations to Minnesota’s lawmakers. The REAL ID record in Minnesota should be set straight.

According to the Star Tribune’s report, Ted Sobel, director of DHS’s Office of State-Issued Identification Support, told Minnesota officials: “We are not asking Minnesota to turn over the keys to your information to anybody else. REAL ID does not affect one way or another how Minnesota protects the information of its residents.”

That is not accurate. REAL ID compliance would require Minnesota to make its drivers’ information available to all other States. The law is unequivocal on that (you can get it right from DHS’s web site):

To meet the requirements of this section, a State shall adopt the following practices in the issuance of drivers’ licenses and identification cards: …
(12) Provide electronic access to all other States to information contained in the motor vehicle database of the State.
(13) Maintain a State motor vehicle database that contains, at a minimum–
(A) all data fields printed on drivers’ licenses and identification cards issued by the State; and
(B) motor vehicle drivers’ histories, including motor vehicle violations, suspensions, and points on licenses.

That seems like turning over the keys to me, and it absolutely affects the security of Minnesotans’ personal information.

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