Tag: Oregon

Oregon Libertarians to Obamacare: Don’t Fence Me In

Ben Nanke, a 20-year-old aspiring songwriter and filmmaker from Salem” was none-too-pleased to see the glossy odes to Obamacare that will run in Oregon at a cost to taxpayers of some $9.9 million. Who can blame him? The videos claim Obamacare will make you healthier and live longer, even though there is zero reliable evidence that’s the case, and much evidence to suggest it won’t. Also, that had better be his own guitar that Matt Sheehy is getting wet.

 So the libertarian Nanke and his friends composed and cut a video for “Don’t Fence Me In,” their own love letter to Oregon, and freedom. Here’s what Nanke wrote at the video’s YouTube page:

As native Oregonians, we found it strange that a large-scale, federally-funded ad campaign is trying to twist the meaning of “the Oregon Spirit.”

Quoting the Oregonian - “Mark Ray, co-owner and creative director of North [who created the ad campaign], said the initial ads are to ‘create almost a hello’ sort of vibe, while stressing an ‘Oregon pride, Oregonians take care of themselves kind of thing.’”

We agree, and believe that “Oregonians take care of themselves” means exactly that. We take care of ourselves. No government mandates, no tax penalties, and no manufactured marketplaces. We love seeing our fellow Oregonians happy, healthy, and strong, which is why we don’t want to see our state fenced in by government-controlled health care.

A sampling of the lyrics, and the full video follow.

Long ago the wagons traveled past the cliffs of the Gorge

We watched the sagebrush trails become I-84

It’s not that I don’t care, it’s that I’ve seen it before

We say “oh, don’t fence me in.”

You say, “ooh, it looks mighty innocent”

but follow the trail, you know it’s gonna derail

I say “ooh, we’re all going to pay for this”

We’ve travelled quite a long road, and we know where this goes

You say it’s time for a change from the Oregon range

Rugged individuality gives way to rain and trees

So don’t tell the people of Oregon that we don’t care

Don’t fence me in. (Don’t fence me in)

We Aren’t Exaggerating When We Rail Against Threats to Economic Liberty

Oregon officials told a 7-year-old with a lemonade stand that she needed to obtain a temporary restaurant license or incur a fine.

I’m rendered speechless, but Josh Blackman exploits the “teaching moment”:

If you are generally opposed to any notion of the right to pursue an honest living, ask yourself, why does it bother you so much that this little girl cannot sell lemonade. Then, ask yourself what you think about other regulations that stifle the entrepreneur. This story does not tug on our heart strings simply because she is adorably selling lemonade for 50 cents a cup (suggested price) at a fair. It tugs on our heart strings because the state is unnecessarily clamping down on this little girl’s ability to make some money.

More from Tim Sandefur.

Thursday Links

Randal O’Toole Takes on Smart Growth in the NYT

The New York Times has a long profile today of Cato’s Randal O’Toole, scourge of urban planners.

But O’Toole doesn’t fit the portrait of a corporate advocate. On visits to Capitol Hill, he blends in as a middle-aged, middle-height man in a dark suit – but his beard gives him away, its shaggy twists seemingly fitting for a forest dweller. He wears a string tie that most Americans would only recognize on Colonel Sanders. His lapel doesn’t carry the standard-issue flag pin but a bronze bust of his dog, Chip. The Belgian tervuren won it in a dog show.

O’Toole routinely hikes and bikes dozens of miles, and he proudly announces that he has never driven a car to work. Far from living on a luxurious Virginia manor, he left his last Oregon town when it added a third stoplight.

Now, from his home computer in Camp Sherman, Ore., population 300, O’Toole rails against smart-growth policies as money sponges that never calm traffic, fill seats on trains, or help the environment.

The story ends with Randal on his way to a conference in Las Vegas, which I also attended. There in the 80-degree early morning heat, he biked 50 miles each morning, on a folding bicycle that he could fit into a suitcase – and still got back to the hotel in time to fix my Powerpoint before my speech. He’s a Renaissance man.

“Sweet” Victory in Oregon

As a follow-up to Jason Kuznicki’s post from January, I am pleased to report that yesterday Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski signed HB 2817—a bill that eliminates the cartelization of the moving business in the Beaver state.

The old law required the Oregon Department of Transportation to notify existing moving companies of businesses that wanted to enter into their market. What’s more, those companies were given a veto over the would-be market entrants thereby locking out all competition to maintain artificially high prices—all with the government’s help.

The owner of a new moving company, Adam Sweet, enlisted the help of Pacific Legal Foundation lawyer and Cato adjunct scholar Tim Sandefur to litigate against the old law. That lawsuit, once it cleared challenges for dismissal, prompted several pieces of legislation that culminated into the bill that the governor signed yesterday.

Congratulations to Mr. Sweet, Tim, and PLF for their well-fought victory for economic liberty for the entrepreneurs and consumers of Oregon!

More details from PLF here.