Tag: Obamacare

First Amendment Victory in Second Circuit

As the legal battle against Obamacare continues, we got good constitutional news today in another aspect of health care law.  The Second Circuit Court of Appeals, based in New York City, ruled that statutes restricting commercial speech about prescription drug-related data gathering are unconstitutional.  The court emphasized that the First Amendment protects “[e]ven dry information, devoid of advocacy, political relevance, or artistic expression.”

The case, IMS Health v. Sorrell, concerned a Vermont law that sought to constrain various aspects of prescriber-identifiable data gathering, dissemination, and use. The state argued that such information collection and exchange could induce doctors to alter their prescribing practices in ways that impose additional costs on the state’s budget. Most notably, the law outlawed the transfer of doctors’ prescription history to facilitate drug companies’ one-on-one marketing—a practice known as “detailing” —because the state believed detailing drives up brand-name drug sales and, in turn, health care costs.  Thus, the Vermont law would have eliminated a key part of the market by hindering economic incentives to comprehensively gather the data. The state argued that the data sharing isn’t “traditional journalistic activity,” it’s not protected by the First Amendment.

Cato joined the Pacific Legal Foundation, the Progress & Freedom Foundation, and two trade associations to file an amicus brief in the case in support of the plaintiffs challenging the law. The Vermont Prescription Restraint Law (and the similar laws enacted in New Hampshire and Maine) imposed unprecedented censorship on a broad swath of socially important information. We are gratified that the Second Circuit upheld First Amendment protections here and congratulate the plaintiffs on their victory.

You can read Cato’s brief here and the Second Circuit’s decision here.

ObamaCare’s ‘Medical Loss Ratio’ Regs Encourage Fraud, Unnecessary Medical Services

Yesterday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued regulations implementing ObamaCare’s rule mandating that health insurers maintain minimum “medical loss ratios.”

Opponents of private health insurance have made a fetish of  MLRs – a statistic that insurers developed to show investors the share of premiums they spend on claims.  (“See? They call it a ‘loss’ when they pay for medical care – that proves they’re evil!”)  So the opponents of private health insurance who crafted ObamaCare included a rule requiring carriers to spend at least 80 percent of premium revenue (large employers must spend 85 percent) on “your health care.”  What could possibly go wrong?

The folly and false compassion of ObamaCare are on full display in the MLR regs, where government bureaucrats have evidently determined that unnecessary and harmful medical services, and even insurance fraud, are in fact good for patients. Okay, HHS bureaucrats don’t actually think that. But ObamaCare’s MLR regs include fraud prevention and utilization review among the administrative expenses on which carriers may spend no more than 20 percent of revenue (15 percent for large employers). That will effectively discourage insurers from policing fraud and conducting utilization reviews that protect patients from the expense and risks of unnecessary medical tests and procedures.

ObamaCare’s fatal conceit is that government bureaucrats can determine and deliver what is good for patients. Consumers will continue to feel the pain – costs will continue to rise and more insurers will flee the marketplace – until Congress gives up that conceit and repeals this law.

RomneyCare’s ‘Connector’ a ‘Legal Pit Bull’ Forcing Fed-Up Mass. Residents to Pay

According to the Boston Herald:

The state’s health insurance connector — the highly touted agency that aims to bring cheap medical care to the masses — has turned into a legal pit bull by aggressively going after a growing number of Bay Staters who say they can’t afford mandated insurance — or the penalties imposed for not having it.

The Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector Authority is cracking down on more than 3,000 residents who are fighting state fines, and has even hired a private law firm to force the health insurance scofflaws to pay penalties of up to $2,000 a year.

All told, more than 7,700 people have appealed state fines for not having health insurance, according to connector spokesman Richard Powers. The agency has hired several private attorneys at $50 an hour to hear many of the appeals, and some 3,150 of them have been denied — and the losers told to pay up.

The connector has also hired the Hub law firm Bowman & Penski — at $125 an hour — to defend itself against 13 lawsuits filed by fed-up taxpayers who insist they can’t afford state required insurance premiums or the escalating fines.

For more on RomneyCare, see “The Massachusetts Health Plan: Much Pain, Little Gain.”

More Proof ObamaCare Is a Sop to Industry

Reuters has helpfully published another article demonstrating that ObamaCare’s biggest cheerleaders are the insurance and drug industries.  That’s because, barring repeal and despite the Obama administration’s fatuous rhetoric about standing up to the special interests, ObamaCare will shower those industries with massive subsidies.  Excerpts follow.

Health Overhaul Should Press Ahead: Industry
By Susan Heavey

Thu Nov 11, 2010 1:39pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Repeal reform? No thanks, say health insurers, drugmakers and others looking for a clearer picture of the U.S. healthcare market after the bruising passage of the controversial overhaul law…

The new healthcare law created “a stable, predictable environment, however painful it has been in the short term,” GlaxoSmithKline Plc’s (GSK.L) Chief Strategy Officer David Redfern said at the summit in New York.

“When you are running a business, the hardest thing is changing policy and a changing environment because it is very difficult to plan, predict and ultimately invest in that sort of scenario,” he said, echoing other speakers.

True enough.  How’s a firm supposed to develop a business plan around uncertain taxpayer subsidies?

Health officials must still hammer out how to implement the law and finalize hundreds of new rules and regulations. Many such details are key, as the sector looks to adjust its business for 2011 and beyond.

Wait, I thought the law created a “stable, predictable environment” and repeal would create uncertainty.  Hmmmm.

“Anti-reform made good talking points before the election,” said the Department of Health and Human Services’ Liz Fowler, adding that people “will find more to like than to dislike” in the law once it is more in place.

Boy, they just won’t let go of that chestnut, will they?  Remember: voters need re-education, not the Obama administration.

Even insurers, which were vilified by Democrats in passing the reforms, said they don’t want a repeal, even as they push for clarity on forthcoming rules and seek additional changes.

Cigna Corp CEO David Cordani and Aetna Inc President Mark Bertolini both urged the nation to move forward on the overhaul.

Even the insurance industry is against repeal?  The folks whose products the law will force 200 million Americans to purchase?  Never saw that coming.

Since the start of 2009, the Morgan Stanley Health Care Payor index has risen 75 percent, outperforming a roughly 35 percent rise for the broader Standard & Poor’s 500 index.

You don’t say.

Unlike insurers[!], drugmakers have escaped largely unscathed under the law, although there is still incentive to shape it.

You don’t say.

Tea Party Not Keen on RomneyCare

The following exchange took place yesterday on the Christian Broadcasting Network between host David Brody and Tea Party Express Chairwoman Amy Kremer.

Brody: Mitt Romney…on the Massachusetts health care situation, you’re going to tell me that’s going to fly in the Tea Party movement?

Kremer: Absolutely not…I’m being honest here…You can’t get away from that.  And that’s the thing is, the days of people being able to do one thing in their state in front of a microphone, and then going to Washington and doing something else. I mean, the Internet, and 24-hour news cycles changed it all, and these people don’t have short memories, they’re digging up everything from the past, and they’re not going to let go of the health care.

Hmm.  I wonder why…


Video of the CBN exchange is available here.  For more on RomneyCare, read “The Massachusetts Health Plan: Much Pain, Little Gain.”

More Supreme Court Review on the Road

In case any of you are regretting not having been able to attend any of my September-October speaking events, here’s my public schedule for November-December (not counting a spirited Obamacare debate against Columbia’s Gillian Metzger last night at the University of Maryland Law School in Baltimore) (events sponsored by the Federalist Society asterisked):

  • Nov. 8 at noon – “Oh, That Rent-Seeking Mickey Mouse: Intellectual Property and Public Choice Theory” – Texas-Wesleyan (Fort Worth) Law School*
  • Nov. 9 at noon – Debate, “The Arizona Immigration Law: Constitutional?  Good Policy?” – St. Mary’s University (San Antonio) Law School*
  • Nov. 10 at noon – Debate on the Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Intepretation – Florida International University (Miami) Law School*
  • Nov.11 at noon – “How I Got My Green Card or Why the Immigration System Is the Worst Part of the U.S. Government (and How to Reform It)” – St. Thomas University (Miami) Law School*
  • Nov.12 at 9:45am – Panel as part of all-day law review symposium, “Cure, Botch or Opiate?  Law, Politics, & the Constitutionality of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” – Florida International University Law School
  • Nov. 15 at noon – Constitutionality of Obamacare – University of Alabama Law School*
  • Nov. 16 at 11:30am – Panel, “Obamacare: Is it Constitutional?” Cumberland University (Birmingham) Law School*
  • Nov. 17 at noon - Debate on the Arizona Scholarship Tax Credit Case – Catholic University (Washington, DC) Law School
  • Nov. 22 at noon – Debate, “The Health Care Reform Act: What It Means for the Market, the Constitution, and You,” University of Michigan Law School*
  • Nov. 22 at 4pm – “The Sweet Mystery of Anthony Kennedy,” Detroit-Mercy Law School*
  • Nov. 23 at noon – “The Chrysler Bailout: Subverting the Constitution, Bankruptcy Law, and Good Sense,” Thomas M. Cooley Law School (Auburn Hills, MI)*
  • Dec. 1 at 10am – Panel, “Everything You Wanted to Know About Health Reform, But Were Afraid to Ask,” American Legislative Exchange Council’s 2010 States and Nation Policy Summit (Washington, DC).
  • Dec. 4 at 8:30am – Debate, “Point\Counterpoint: Diagnosing the Constitutionality of Federal Health Care Reforms,” Council of State Governments National Conference, Providence.  

As always, if you attend any of these events, please do come up and introduce yourself.