Tag: new at cato

New at Cato

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  • In Wednesday’s Cato Daily Podcast, Daniel J. Ikenson asks, “What about Ford, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, BMW, Volkswagen and Kia?”

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  • In The Wall Street Journal, John Hasnas asks whether “compassion and empathy” are really characteristics we want in a judge.
  • Richard W. Rahn reports on the extreme changes about to occur in the British government in The Washington Times.
  • In Monday’s Cato Daily Podcast, Mark Calabria weighs in on “shadow banking” and the effort to regulate it.

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  • In Reason Magazine, Brink Lindsey discusses what he calls “Nostalgianomics,” and how liberal economists pine for days no liberal should want to revisit.
  • At TheNextRight.com, Roger Pilon explains why the Sotomajor confirmation hearings are an opportunity for Republicans to reestablish their identity.
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  • In USA Today, Jerry Taylor argues that Obama’s plan to require new  vehicles sold in 2016 to get an average of 39 miles per gallon or better is likely to result in all cost no benefit.
  • In The American Spectator, Doug Bandow says that while it is important for the U.S. to encourage dialogue with Muslim nations, we must not shy away from serious discussions about religious persecution.
  • Randal O’Toole argues in USA Today that Obama’s plan for high-speed rail will cost taxpayers billions of dollars and do little to reduce traffic congestion or improve the environment.
  • In The Washington Examiner, Gene Healy discusses why President Obama’s approach to terrorism is virtually identical to Bush/Cheney’s.
  • In today’s Cato Daily Podcast, James Bartholomew argues that the welfare state in Britain has resulted in a generation of badly educated citizens and has undermined its original intent.

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  • Chris Edwards co-authors an article in The Washington Post arguing why we should look to Canada as an example of fiscal conservatism.
  • In Monday’s Cato Daily Podcast, Mark Calabria weighs in on the aftermath of the financial crisis.

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  • In The Washington Times, Richard Rahn explains how the current tax crackdown could deepen the country’s economic woes.
  • In the Washington Examiner, Gene Healy discusses Wanda Sykes’ speech at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner and the lost pastime of making fun of the president.
  • Nat Hentoff cries foul on the new “hate crimes” legislation that is currently advancing through Congress.
  • On NPR.org, Michael Cannon explains why 2009 will not be a good year for health care reform.
  • At National Review online, Jerry Taylor contends that Jack Kemp’s political career ultimately did the cause of limited government more harm than good.
  • In Wednesday’s Cato Daily Podcast, Mark A. Calabria discusses the president’s plan for regulating credit card companies.
  • Watch Chris Edwards on CNN discussing why the pay gap between government and private workers is rapidly growing wider.

New at Cato

Here are a few highlights from Cato Today, a daily email from the Cato Institute. You can subscribe, here.

  • Don’t want to buy GM, Chrysler or AIG stock? Too bad, says Richard Rahn.
  • Jim Powell spells out Obama’s tax assault on U.S. businesses in National Review.
  • In Forbes magazine, Dan Mitchell reiterates his defense of tax havens.
  • Will Wilkinson explains what happens when you start playing politics with private enterprise in Marketplace.
  • In Thursday’s Cato Daily Podcast, ElCato.org editor Gabriela Calderon discusses elections in Ecuador.
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