Tag: Neal Kurk

Here’s Your Answer, Governor Martinez

New Mexico’s Governor, Susana Martinez (R), wrote a letter to DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano last week asking for assurance that implementation of our national ID law, the REAL ID Act, will not be pushed back again beyond the upcoming January 15, 2013 deadline. Here’s your answer, Governor Martinez.

Congress passed REAL ID in 2005 as an attachment to a military spending bill. The law never had a hearing in the House or Senate.

In 2006, the policy of having a national ID implemented by states was beginning to sink in, and in April of that year, Representative Neal Kurk, a Republican from Weare, New Hampshire, spoke eloquently against REAL ID, saying:

I don’t believe that the people of New Hampshire elected us to help the federal government create a national identification card. We care more for our liberties than to meekly hand over to the federal government the potential to enumerate, track, identify, and eventually control.

Thus began the “REAL ID Rebellion.”

It wasn’t the U.S. Congress that had the first hearing on REAL ID. It was the New Mexico legislature in September 2006.

A year and a half after the law passed, New Mexico legislators heard about the costs and consequences of having a national ID. The Wall Street Journal dubbed the federal policy “Real Bad ID” the next month.

In 2007, states across the country started passing legislation barring themselves from complying with REAL ID and denouncing the law. By 2009, half the states in the country would say “NO” to REAL ID.

The law had a three-year implementation schedule, meaning states were supposed to start issuing national IDs in March 2008. But about a year before the deadline, then-Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff announced in conjunction with the release of draft implementation rules that the Department would grant extensions to all States requesting them. The final deadline for compliance was now going to be December 31, 2009.

The DHS didn’t come out with standards for REAL ID until January 2008, just months from the original May 2008 statutory deadline. DHS pushed the deadline for extension requests, which hadn’t come in, to March 31, 2008. The December 31, 2009 deadline that DHS had earlier announced became an “initial” deadline, with a later “real” deadline of October 11, 2009 for states that achieved “certain milestones.”

When the March 31, 2008 deadline for extension requests came, the states were not forthcoming with them. Montana notified the DHS that was not going to comply with the REAL ID Act, ever. The DHS saw the writing on the wall and treated that notification as a request for an extension—and granted it.

The Missoulian reported “Montana Wins REAL ID Standoff.” New Hampshire won, too. And so did South Carolina.

By September 2009, several states were declining to ask for a second extension (with a showing of material compliance), so DHS kicked the deadline for extension requests down to December 2009. And in December 2009, with states still refusing compliance with REAL ID, the DHS stayed the compliance deadline “until further notice.”

In March of 2011, the DHS quietly extended the deadline again, this time to the current date of January 2013.

You can see the writing on the wall, Governor Martinez. The states are not going to implement REAL ID—not the ones that respect their place in our constitutional system, anyway. Accordingly, the DHS will—as it must—extend the deadline for REAL ID once again, as Congress continues its failure to do away with the moribund national ID.

Governor Martinez may see this as a way to score some points—a two-fer even. She can suggest that DHS Secretary is soft on security and she can use REAL ID in her push to restrict access to drivers’ licenses in her state.

But when Janet Napolitano extends the REAL ID deadline, she’ll be just as soft on security as her predecessor Michael Chertoff was. New Mexico is one of the few states that still uses drivers’ licenses to administer driving and doesn’t condition licensing on proving one’s citizenship or immigration status. If Governor Martinez wants to change that, investing New Mexicans in the national ID system as a byproduct of Congress’ failure to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that’s between her and her constituents.

Cardless National ID and the E-Verify Rebellion

New Hampshire was the state where the “REAL ID rebellion” got its start. There, in 2006, Rep. Neal Kurk (R-Weare) took to the floor of the New Hampshire House to talk about his principled opposition to the federal national ID law.

In stirring words, Kurk urged his colleagues to overturn a committee recommendation that no action should be taken on his bill to have New Hampshire reject REAL ID. The House went on to pass his bill and half the states in the nation soon followed suit.

Now a bill pending in the New Hampshire House responds to a more insidious version of the federal government’s national ID plans: E-Verify.

E-Verify is a federal background check system that its proponents intend to be used on every person seeking work in the United States. Once in place, E-Verify would expand to new uses, giving the federal government direct regulatory control of all Americans’ lives through control of proof of identity. It’s being fitted to operate using only databases, so I’ve been referring to it as a “cardless national ID.”

New Hampshire Rep. Seth Cohn (R-Merrimack 6) has introduced a bill to prevent his state from contributing New Hampshirites’ personal data to the E-Verify system. HB 1549 would not only prohibit the state from allowing citizens’ personal data to be used in E-Verify. It would prohibit the state from requiring employers to participate in the E-Verify system.

It’s an appropriate response to the Department of Homeland Security’s latest move. You see, a branch of E-Verify is called the “RIDE” program. That stands for “Records and Information from Department of Motor Vehicles for E-Verify” (Yeah, it’s a stretch…) Basically, RIDE is the conduit through which the states are going to start passing data to the federal government, weaving together that national ID outside of the REAL ID Act.

In their desire to bring illegal immigration under control, a lot of people have convinced themselves over many years that growing the federal government and conscripting businesses into “internal enforcement” of immigration law was the way to go. Unfortunately, that route costs a lot of money, it bloats the federal government, and it requires a national ID system, which is a threat to liberty that Americans reject. My paper, “Franz Kafka’s Solution to Illegal Immigration,” goes through many of the details.

Is this the beginning of the E-Verify rebellion? It’s a welcome addition to the national debate from the “Live Free or Die” state.