Tag: medical licensing

Better than Medicaid Expansion: Missouri Senate Approves ‘Good Samaritan’ Law

Never mind Medicaid expansion. The Missouri Senate has approved a bill that would allow doctors to give free medical care to the poor. 

You wouldn’t think the government would have to pass a law to let doctors give free health care to the poor. Yet nearly every state prohibits out-of-state physicians and other clinicians from providing free charitable care to the poor unless those clinicians obtain a new medical license from that state.

In a forthcoming paper for the Cato Institute, I explain how medical licensing laws deny care to the poor, and how reforming those laws is a better alternative than Medicaid expansion:

Remote Area Medical has had to turn away patients or scrap clinics in places California, Florida, and Georgia. “Before Georgia told us to stop,” says founder Stan Brock, “we used to go down to southern Georgia and work with the Lions Club there treating patients.” After a tornado devastated Joplin, Missouri, Remote Area Medical arrived with a mobile eyeglass lab, yet state officials prohibited the visiting optometrists from giving away free glasses.

These stories belie the claim that government licensing of medical practitioners protects patients. Instead, they block access to care for the most vulnerable patients.

States should adopt “Good Samaritan” laws, like those enacted in Tennessee, Illinois, and Connecticut. Those states allow out-of-state-licensed clinicians to deliver free charitable care in their states without obtaining a new license. To protect patients, visiting clinicians are and should be subject to the licensing malpractice laws of the state in which they are practicing.

This week, Missouri’s Senate passed such a Good Samaritan law. (It even lets licensed veterinarians come to the state to provide free charitable care to animals.) The bill also provides an inducement to out-of-state clinicians by reducing their liability exposure for malpractice. It would be better if the state were to let doctors and patients choose their own malpractice liability rules via contract. Unlike ObamaCare’s massive Medicaid expansion, this bill would expand access to care for the poor without costing states or taxpayers a dime.

Here’s a video on Remote Area Medical, the good that it does–and the good that licensing laws prevent it from doing.

Even if you’re not ready to concede that medical licensing laws are harmful and should be repealed, you would have to admit it makes no sense for the government to block licensed doctors from treating the poor for free.

‘Coverage Will Not Necessarily Translate into Care’

Members of the Anti-Universal Coverage Club already knew this. Members of the Church of Universal Coverage may want to take heed. The New York Times reports:

In the Inland Empire, an economically depressed region in Southern California, President Obama’s health care law is expected to extend insurance coverage to more than 300,000 people by 2014. But coverage will not necessarily translate into care: Local health experts doubt there will be enough doctors to meet the area’s needs. There are not enough now.

Other places around the country, including the Mississippi Delta, Detroit and suburban Phoenix, face similar problems…

Moreover, across the country, fewer than half of primary care clinicians were accepting new Medicaid patients as of 2008, making it hard for the poor to find care even when they are eligible for Medicaid. The expansion of Medicaid accounts for more than one-third of the overall growth in coverage in President Obama’s health care law.

But isn’t the important thing that they’ll have a piece of paper that says “health insurance”?

To Help the Poor, Don’t Expand Medicaid — Just Get out of the Way

The gods tell me I’m not allowed to post the article, “Medical volunteers not free to cross state lines; Charity wants changes so it can help more,” from The Tennesseean in its entirety. So here’s an, ahem, excerpt:

The founder of the Knoxville-based charity Remote Area Medical Volunteer Corps says his nonprofit is hamstrung by laws preventing medical volunteers from crossing state lines.

Stan Brock told the Bristol Herald Courier that RAM has provided free medical and dental care to more than half-a-million patients since 1992, but it could serve even more if state laws were changed…

Brock said the group recently went to Joplin, Mo., with a mobile eyeglass lab. But they were not allowed to make free glasses because their volunteer optometrists and opticians were not licensed in the state.

Events in California have had dozens of empty dental chairs as patients were turned away — not for lack of willing volunteers but because state law creates impossible hurdles for out-of-state providers.

“Before Georgia told us to stop, we used to go down to southern Georgia and work with the Lions Club there treating patients,” he said.

Brock said the laws are designed as “turf protection,” but his charity efforts pose no threat to traditional medical providers…

RAM began providing its free services, which it calls “expeditions” in South America. Its first expedition in the U.S. was in Tennessee, which also passed the first law allowing the providers to cross state lines for charity care. Illinois later adopted a similar law, modeled after Tennessee’s.

Brock said those laws have three key components: They allow health providers from out of state to provide charity care, protect them against frivolous lawsuits and are simple enough to allow busy volunteers to come without jumping through hoops.

See also this moving photoblog about a Remote Area Medical “expedition” to Appalachia.

For more about Remote Area Medical, click here.