Tag: guns

Milwaukee Man Shoots Armed Robber

A Milwaukee man only recently acquired his permit to carry a concealed handgun and then found himself in the middle of an armed robbery.   As the robber threatened a store clerk with a shotgun, the permit holder was able to draw his weapon and shoot the culprit.  The Milwaukee District Attorney said: “He disrupted an act that potentially exposed himself and others to great bodily harm.”

Last week, Cato released a new study concerning the frequency with which citizens use guns in self-defense, along with a map to track such events.  We’ve already received many suggestions from readers all over the web and we’ll be updating our map regularly.

(H/T Ann Althouse)

New Cato Study: Tough Targets

Today, Cato is releasing a new study, Tough Targets: When Criminals Face Armed Resistance from Citizens, by Clayton Cramer and David Burnett.  The paper makes use of a news report-gathering project to explore in more detail how Americans use guns in self-defense.

The paper makes many excellent points, but I’ll mention just three here.  First, the average person tends to imagine that these self-defense situations involve criminals getting shot.  Such cases do occur, but the overwhelming number of self-defense cases involve situations where the gun is never fired.  

The second point relates to the first.  The average person usually does not hear about defensive gun cases because news media organizations do not consider the incidents worthy of coverage.  If a burglar runs away from a break-in when he discovers that someone is at the home and is armed, it may only garner a terse mention in the paper, if it makes the newspaper at all.  With no shot fired, no injuries, and no suspect in custody, newspeople typically decline coverage.  The point here is not to criticize the news media’s handling of such incidents–rather it is just to remind readers that we tend to hear about criminals using guns to perpetrate crimes, but we do not hear about many self-defense cases.  In this milieu, it is understandable why many people would develop negative opinions about guns.

Third, when a gun owner does shoot a rapist or is able to hold a burglar at gunpoint until the police arrive on the scene, it is very likely that more than one crime has been prevented.  That’s because had the culprit not been stopped, he very likely would have targeted other people as well.

Gun control proponents stress the idea of harm reduction.  They say the enactment of  firearm regulations will reduce accidents and the criminal use of guns.  But if policymakers are truly interested in harm reduction, they must consider the number of crimes that are thwarted by gun owners.  Each year gun owners prevent a great deal of criminal mayhem–murders, rapes, batteries, and robberies.  Tough Targets gathers dozens and dozens of examples of ordinary people using guns to stop criminal attacks.  The defensive use of guns happens much more often than most people realize.

In addition to the paper itself, we have a new page on the Cato web site that will track, to the extent we can, defensive gun cases around the country.

For more information, listen to a podcast interview with co-author Clayton Cramer, or see related Cato scholarship.

Political Trends and Gun Control Politics

From today’s Washington Post:

During his campaign, Obama supported reintroducing the lapsed assault weapon ban, promised to eliminate an amendment requiring the FBI to destroy records of gun buyers’ background checks and advocated closing the gun-show loophole. Since taking office, the president has done none of that, and before the midterm elections, he shelved a proposal requiring gun dealers to report bulk sales of high-powered semiautomatic rifles. In his State of the Union address, just weeks after the Giffords shooting in January, Obama made no mention of guns. … Other leading Democrats, even those traditionally willing to offer full-throated support for gun-control efforts, have grown surprisingly less vocal as they take on more of a national role.

The Dems have lost enthusiasm for gun control.  No question.  But seems to me that media interest is also a big factor here.  When the news media turned from Gabrielle Giffords to Libya, that’s where Obama went next.

For related Cato work, go here and here.

Guns Save Lives, Part XXXIVXX

John Lee still has his life and four children still have a father because Mr. Lee  had a handgun when three criminals tried to kill him and take his money.

When John Q. Citizen takes out a gun and the criminals flee, reporters don’t consider the incident “news” (at least when there are no injuries)–so guns are typically on the evening news when they are used by criminals.  As a result of that skewed coverage, it is no wonder that many people have a negative view about firearms.

On June 17, Cato will be hosting a forum about guns, crime, and self-defense.  Speakers include John Lott, Jeff Snyder, and Paul Helmke of the Brady Campaign.

For related Cato scholarship, go here.

Don’t Confuse Me with the Facts

Opposition is building to the proposed D.C. Voting Rights Act because it also restricts D.C.’s draconian gun-control laws. Mary G. Wilson, president of the League of Women Voters of the United States, and Billie Day, president of the League of Women Voters of the District of Columbia, said today that “asking citizens to sacrifice their safety in order to have representation in Congress is unacceptable.”

And on NPR’s Morning Edition today, we heard the thoughts of D.C. councilwoman Mary Cheh, my con law professor: “I would rather wait to eternity before I bow down to the gun lobby and say ‘The only way I’m gonna get this is if we give up the right to protect ourselves.’”

The District’s gun laws protect us? By keeping guns out of the hands of criminals?

New Lawsuit against DC Government

Yesterday the Washington Post ran a nice profile about Tom Palmer and other DC residents who are challenging the constitutionality of regulations that make it a crime for people to bring their firearm outside of their residence for purposes of self-defense.  Most criminal attacks occur outside the home (around 87%) and the criminals are armed and always have the advantage of choosing when they’ll strike – and that’s usually when there are no cops around.

Related Cato scholarship here.  More here.

Chapman on Chicago Pols and Guns

Steve Chapman has another terrific column – this one about gun regulations and the tendency of politicians to exempt themselves from such regulations – for the public good, of course.  Here’s an excerpt:

Roland Burris, another Chicagoan, has endorsed a nationwide ban on handguns and, in 1993, organized Chicago’s first Gun Turn-in Day. But the following year, while running unsuccessfully for governor, he admitted he owned a handgun – “for protection,” he explained – and hadn’t seen fit to turn it in along with those other firearms. Lesser mortals apparently can protect themselves with forks and spoons.

The Supreme Court will soon be hearing an important case about Chicago’s firearm regulations and the right to keep and bear arms.  Cato just filed an amicus brief (pdf) in that case.

Also, persons interested in this subject should know that Cato associate policy analyst David Kopel has a new book just out.

For additional Cato work, go here.