Tag: drug war; marijuana

Oregon Marijuana Policy

Part of Oregon’s Measure 91, passed in November and legally titled Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act, goes into effect today. The new law allows men and women, 21 and older, to grow limited amounts of marijuana on their property and to possess a limited amount for personal, recreational use. Specifically, an Oregonian can possess up to eight ounces of marijuana and grow up to four marijuana plants in their homes. Each adult can possess up to an ounce in public, but one may not use marijuana in public.  §6 of Measure 91 lists all the guidelines that one would need to know about what is now legally permissible personal and household use under the new law.

The personal use and cultivation of marijuana will not be overseen by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC). That agency will be tasked with overseeing the commercial use of marijuana, including licensing, taxing, and regulating. The review and acceptance of licenses will begin in January. Actual sale and purchasing of commercially grown marijuana will also begin sometime in 2016.

The fact that recreational use and private in-home ownership will now be legal has sparked some media interest. Particularly, the question has been asked: How can interested Oregonians begin their recreational use or home growing when there is no legal sale?  That’s a good question with respect to the lawful supply.  The underground market is fairly easy to find.

For related Cato work, go here and here.

Steep Drop in Colorado Marijuana Arrests

A new report from the Drug Policy Alliance details a steep decline in the number of marijuana arrests in Colorado and remarks on the beneficial effects.

The key points:

  • Since 2010, marijuana possession charges are down by more than 90%, marijuana cultivation charges are down by 96%, and marijuana distribution charges are down by 99%.
  • The number of marijuana possession charges in Colorado courts has decreased by more than 25,000 since 2010—from 30,428 in 2010 to just 1,922 in 2014.
  • According to raw data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System, drug-related incidents are down 23% since 2010, based on a 53% drop in marijuana-related incidents.
  • In 2010 the top five Colorado counties for marijuana possession cases were El Paso, Jefferson, Adams, Larimer, and Boulder.  Marijuana possession cases in those counties all dropped by at least 83% from 2010 to 2014.
  • Marijuana distribution charges for young men of color did not increase, to the relief of racial justice advocates wary of a “net-widening” effect following legalization. The black rate for distribution incidents dropped from 87 per 100,000 in 2012 to 25 per 100,000 in 2014.
  • Racial disparities for still-illegal and mostly petty charges persist for black people when compared to white people, primarily because of the specific increase of charges for public use combined with the disproportionate rates of police contact in communities of color. The marijuana arrest rate for black people in 2014 was 2.4 times higher than the arrest rates for white people, just as it was in 2010.
  • The report also reveals a decline in synthetic marijuana arrests, presumably because people are less likely to use synthetic marijuana when marijuana itself is no longer criminalized.

According to Art Way, Colorado state director of the Drug Policy Alliance:

It’s heartening to see that tens of thousands of otherwise law-abiding Coloradans have been spared the travesty of getting handcuffed or being charged for small amounts of marijuana. By focusing on public health rather than criminalization, Colorado is better positioned to address the potential harms of marijuana use, while diminishing many of the worst aspects of the war on drugs.

Migrating for Marijuana

From the Washington Post:

For the parents of children with intractable epilepsy, the stream of constant seizures, emergency-room visits and powerful medications can become a demoralizing blur. Beth Collins of Fairfax County said her teenage daughter suffered as many as 300 epileptic seizures per day.

“There were days when I just laid in bed with her and prayed,” Collins said, “and watched her because I wasn’t sure what would happen.”

Now, the seizures have all but stopped. Each day, Collins gives her daughter Jennifer a dose of medical marijuana oil from a syringe, as any parent might administer liquid medicine to a child.

But Collins can’t offer the cannabis extract from her kitchen in Fairfax, where she raised Jennifer for 14 years. Instead, she does so in a small two-bedroom apartment in Colorado Springs….

“I feel a lot better,” Jennifer said of the treatment, which is scientifically untested. “I can focus more, I’m doing better on tests in school. My memory’s improved a lot.” Her seizures are “not completely gone,” but her mother said that “we’ve had days where I’ve seen very few, maybe one or two. That’s a major decrease.”

Another Virginia parent, Dara Lightle, says her daughter started having seizures at age 6.  Nothing seemed to work.  When doctors suggested removing part of her brain, Ms. Lightle put aside her earlier reservations about marijuana, and moved to Colorado.  Daughter is doing much better.  Instead of five seizures a day, she has had three seizures over the past 13 weeks.

Colorado and 19 other states have an medical exception to their laws banning marijuana.  There is no exception in the federal law.  To repeat, in the eyes of federal law, anyone who possesses marijuana is guilty of a crime.  One more snippet from the Post:

Officials with the FDA, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the Office of National Drug Control Policy all declined to discuss the government’s position on marijuana oil or relaxing restrictions on marijuana for research purposes.

Hmm.  

More here.

Sheriff John Urquhart on Marijuana and Law Enforcement

Today the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the interaction between federal and state law with respect to marijuana.  Last November, voters in Colorado and Washington approved referenda that would legalize marijuana in those states.  The most impressive witness at today’s hearing was Sheriff John Urquhart, who is responsible for the Seattle area in Washington.  He said the drug war is a failure and that the people in his state are ready to try something new.  Here is a link to the video for the entire hearing. Check out Sheriff Urquhart’s five minute introduction which begins at the 1 hour 29 minute mark.  His written testimony can be found here.

For other police officials who call for ending the drug war, check out LEAP (Law Enforcement Against Prohibition).