Tag: debates

Break Out of Those February Blahs!

…by attending one of my public events this month.  Here’s what I currently have scheduled (those sponsored by Federalist Society marked with an asterisk):

  • Feb.7 at 4pm – Comparative Constitutionalism, Rule of Law, and Lessons from Iraq – NYU Law School*
  • Feb.8 at 1pm – Panel on Judicial Activism (American Constitution Society conference on “Federal Courts, Inc.?”) – NYU Law School 
  • Feb.9 at 1pm – Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacare – Brooklyn Law School*
  • Feb.10 at 10:45am – Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacare – AMA Advocacy Conference at the Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC
  • Feb.15 at noon – Is Dodd-Frank Constitutional? – Cato Policy Forum 
  • Feb.16 at 12:15pm – Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacare – University of Akron Law School*
  • Feb.16 or 17 - TBD – possible event(s) at Case Western and/or Cleveland State Law Schools*
  • Feb.20 at 10:45 – “Are There Any Limits on Federal Power?” – Students for Liberty International Conference, George Washington University Marvin Center, Washington, DC
  • Feb.22 at noon – Debate on Constitutionality of Obamacare – University of Arkansas Law School*
  • Feb.23 at 12:20 – TBD – Southern Methodist University, Dallas*

As always, if you attend any of these events, please come up and introduce yourself.  You can also follow my travels and travelogues on Twitter at @ishapiro.

Upcoming Debates on Obamacare, Use of Foreign Law

Last year I hit about 35 states on various lecture/debate tours.  To round that out – and further reduce the states I’ve never visited (though Alaska, Iowa, Nebraska, and the Dakotas will stubbornly remain untrodden by my feet) – this winter I have a schedule that’s eventful but not insane like my fall was.  Here are the rest of my public events in January (all sponsored by the Federalist Society):

  • Jan. 18 at noon — Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacare — University of Colorado-Boulder Law School 
  • Jan.19 at noon — Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacre — University of Wyoming Law School
  • Jan.20 at 11am — Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacare – BYU Law School 
  • Jan.24 at 12:15pm — Debate on the Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Interpretation – University of Utah Law School 
  • Jan.26 at 5pm — Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacare – Widener University Law School (Wilmington, DE campus) 

As always, if you attend any of these events, please do come up and introduce yourself. You can also follow me on Twitter at @ishapiro.

More Supreme Court Review on the Road

In case any of you are regretting not having been able to attend any of my September-October speaking events, here’s my public schedule for November-December (not counting a spirited Obamacare debate against Columbia’s Gillian Metzger last night at the University of Maryland Law School in Baltimore) (events sponsored by the Federalist Society asterisked):

  • Nov. 8 at noon – “Oh, That Rent-Seeking Mickey Mouse: Intellectual Property and Public Choice Theory” – Texas-Wesleyan (Fort Worth) Law School*
  • Nov. 9 at noon – Debate, “The Arizona Immigration Law: Constitutional?  Good Policy?” – St. Mary’s University (San Antonio) Law School*
  • Nov. 10 at noon – Debate on the Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Intepretation – Florida International University (Miami) Law School*
  • Nov.11 at noon – “How I Got My Green Card or Why the Immigration System Is the Worst Part of the U.S. Government (and How to Reform It)” – St. Thomas University (Miami) Law School*
  • Nov.12 at 9:45am – Panel as part of all-day law review symposium, “Cure, Botch or Opiate?  Law, Politics, & the Constitutionality of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” – Florida International University Law School
  • Nov. 15 at noon – Constitutionality of Obamacare – University of Alabama Law School*
  • Nov. 16 at 11:30am – Panel, “Obamacare: Is it Constitutional?” Cumberland University (Birmingham) Law School*
  • Nov. 17 at noon - Debate on the Arizona Scholarship Tax Credit Case – Catholic University (Washington, DC) Law School
  • Nov. 22 at noon – Debate, “The Health Care Reform Act: What It Means for the Market, the Constitution, and You,” University of Michigan Law School*
  • Nov. 22 at 4pm – “The Sweet Mystery of Anthony Kennedy,” Detroit-Mercy Law School*
  • Nov. 23 at noon – “The Chrysler Bailout: Subverting the Constitution, Bankruptcy Law, and Good Sense,” Thomas M. Cooley Law School (Auburn Hills, MI)*
  • Dec. 1 at 10am – Panel, “Everything You Wanted to Know About Health Reform, But Were Afraid to Ask,” American Legislative Exchange Council’s 2010 States and Nation Policy Summit (Washington, DC).
  • Dec. 4 at 8:30am – Debate, “Point\Counterpoint: Diagnosing the Constitutionality of Federal Health Care Reforms,” Council of State Governments National Conference, Providence.  

As always, if you attend any of these events, please do come up and introduce yourself.

Slouching Towards a New Supreme Court Term

We’re now three weeks away from the new Supreme Court term – I know you’re as excited as I am – and after a summer that included big opinions from The Nine, more confirmation hearings, and front-page district court decisions (on ObamaCare, immigration, and gay marriage), we roll into a fall full of even more legal intrigue.  Indeed, the first Monday of October that marks the first high court arguments of the new season is pretty much the first day of school for us Court-watchers.  And what better way to go back to school than to attend Cato’s ninth annual Constitution Day symposium this coming Thursday?

But don’t think that Constitution Day marks my re-emergence into the public sphere after a long six weeks slaving away at the Cato Supreme Court Review.  No, that moment, when I opened my office door, shook off the cobwebs, and went forward into our glorious future came last week, with panels on ObamaCare and immigration reform at the University of Virginia and Liberty University, respectively.  Those two law schools did a wonderful job in organizing and publicizing their events.  And here’s the rest of my schedule through the end of October, many of which continue my ObamaCare debate challenge (events sponsored by the Federalist Society are asterisked):

  • Sept. 13 at 1pm at Boston University Law School - Preview of the New Supreme Court Term*
  • Sept. 14 at noon at Harvard Law School - Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacare against Prof. Mark Tushnet*
  • Sept. 17 at noon at Rayburn House Office Building B-340 - Capitol Hill Briefing on the Supreme Court and Economic Liberty
  • Sept. 20 at 5pm at Loyola University Law School (Chicago) - Panel on the Constitutionality of Obamacare*
  • Sept. 21 at noon at Northwestern University Law School (Chicago) - Preview of the New Supreme Court Term*
  • Sept. 22 at noon at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Debate on the Constitutionality of ObamaCare*
  • Sept. 25 - George Mason law professor and Cato adjunct scholar Ilya Somin’s wedding - Please do congratulate him!
  • Sept. 28 at 12:30 - University of Kansas Law School - Debate on the Constitutionality of ObamaCare*
  • Sept. 29 at lunch - Kansas City Federalist Society Lawyers Chapter - ObamaCare and Missouri’s Prop C*
  • Sept. 30 at 8:30 - Missouri Bar Association Annual Meeting - Panel on the Supreme Court
  • Sept. 30 at 1pm - University of Missouri Law School - The Constitutionality of Obamacare*
  • Oct. 4 at 10am - U.S. Supreme Court - First Monday!
  • Oct. 5 at 5pm - Widener University Law School (Delaware) - The Constitutionality of Obamacare*
  • Oct. 9 at 7pm - Washington Capitals home opener against the New Jersey Devils (I’m a season-ticket holder)
  • Oct. 12 at noon - Lewis & Clark University Law School (Portland, OR) - TBD*
  • Oct. 12 in the evening - Portland Federalist Society Lawyers Chapter - TBD*
  • Oct. 13 at noon - Willamette University Law School - TBD*
  • Oct. 16 at 6pm - University of Toronto Schools Centennial Gala (Go Blues!)
  • Oct. 19 at noon - University of Southern California Law School (L.A.) - Immigration*
  • Oct. 20 at noon - Chapman University Law School - Immigration*
  • Oct. 21 at noon - Orange County Federalist Society Lawyers Chapter - TBD*
  • Oct. 22 all day - Chapman University Law School Nexus Journal of Law & Policy Symposium - “Citizens Divided on Citizens United: Campaign Finance Reform and the First Amendment”
  • Oct. 26 at lunch - Stanford University Law School - TBD*
  • Oct. 27 at noon - University of the Pacific Law School (Stockton, CA) - Debate on the Constitutionality of Obamacare*
  • Oct. 28 at 12:45 - University of California at Berkeley Law School - Debate on Judicial Activism*

If you come out to any of these events, please do come up and introduce yourself.

Palmer and Cowen on Libertarianism

On Tuesday I hosted a Book Forum for Tom Palmer’s new book, Realizing Freedom: Libertarian Theory, History, and Practice. You can see the video here. I thought Tyler Cowen’s comments were very astute, so I reproduce an abridged version here:

The first question is, “What do I, as a reader, see as the essential unity or unities in the book?” And I see really two. The first is I see this as a construction and articulation of a vision of what I call reasonable libertarianism. I think we’re in a world right now that is growing very partisan and very rabid, and a lot of things which are called libertarian in the Libertarian Party, or what you might call the Lew Rockwell / Ron Paul camp, are to my eye not exactly where libertarianism should be, and I think Tom has been a very brave and articulate advocate of a reasonable libertarianism. And if I ask myself, “Does the book succeed in this endeavor?” I would say, “Yes.”

The second unity in the book, I think, has to do with the last thirty years of world history. I know in the United States now there is less liberty. But overall, the world as a whole, over the last thirty years, has seen more movement towards more liberty than perhaps in any other period of human history. And I suspect most of these movements toward liberty will last. So there have been these movements towards liberty, and they have been motivated, in part, by ideas. The question arises, which are the ideas that have been the important ones for this last thirty years? And I view Tom’s book, whether he intended it as such or not, as a kind of guide to which have been the important ideas driving the last thirty years. And a lot of the book goes back into history pretty far – the eighteenth century, the Levellers, debates over natural rights – and I think precisely because it takes this broader perspective it is one of the best guides – maybe the best guide – to what have been the most important ideas driving the last thirty years (as opposed to the misleading ideas or the dead-end ideas). So that’s my take on the essential unities.

Another question you might ask about a collection of essays is, “Which of them did I like best?” I thought about this for a while, and I have two nominations. The first one is “Twenty Myths about Markets,” which is the essay on economics. I don’t know any piece by an economist that does such a good job of poking holes in a lot of economic fallacies and just laying out what you hear so often. You would think an economist would have written this long ago, but to the best of my knowledge, not.

The other favorite little piece of mine is called “Six Facts about Iraq,” which  explains from Tom’s point of view – and Tom has been there a number of times – what’s going on in Iraq and why. It is only a few pages long, but I felt that I got a better sense of Iraq reading this short piece than almost anything else I’ve come across.

I’m not sure exactly what’s the common element between the two I liked best – they both start with a number – but I think the ones I liked best reminded me the most of Tom when he is talking. I had the sense of Tom being locked in a room, and forced to address a question, and not being allowed to leave until he had given his bottom line approach. And I think what he’s very good at through out the book is just getting directly to the point.

There’s more to Tyler’s comments, and lots more from both of them in response to questions, so check out the video.

More Supreme Court Review on the Road

As an update to an earlier post about my speaking schedule this fall, here are my remaining public events through Thanksgiving.  All these events, other than the one on Nov. 3, are sponsored by the Federalist Society (and in some cases co-sponsored by other organizations) and all are open to the public.  As always, if you decide to attend one of the presentations after learning of it from this blog post, please feel free to ishapiro [at] cato [dot] org (drop me a line) beforehand, and do introduce yourself after the event.

Event info after the jump.

Oct. 26 at 12:00pm -  Florida International University Law School (Miami) - Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Interpretation

Oct. 27 at 12:30pm - University of Miami Law School - Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Intepretation

Oct. 28 at 12:30pm - University of Dayton Law School - Hillary Clinton and the Emoluments Clause

Oct. 29 at 12:00pm - Northern Kentucky University Chase College of Law - October Term 2009 Overview

Nov. 3 at 12:00pm - Environmental Law Institute (Washington) - Panel on Stop the Beach Renourishment and Judicial Takings

Nov. 4 at 12:00pm - Yeshiva University Cardozo Law School (NYC) - Immigration and the Constitution

Nov. 4 at 3:00pm - Seton Hall University Law School - Debate on the The Chrysler Bankruptcy

Nov. 5 at 12:00pm - Columbia University Law School - Debate on the Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Interpretation

Nov. 16 at 12:00pm - St. Louis University Law School - Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Interpretation

Nov. 17 at 12: 00pm - Washington University (St. Louis) Law School - The Looming Danger of Transnational Progressivism

Cato Supreme Court Review on the Road

With last week’s Constitution Day conference behind us (watch it here) – and the release of the 2008-2009 Cato Supreme Court Review – I can finally escape the office where I’ve been holed up all summer.  Yes, it’s time to go on the road and talk about all these wonderful legal issues we’ve learned about over the past year, as well as previewing the new Supreme Court term.

To that end, below the jump is my fall speaking schedule so far.  All these events are sponsored by the Federalist Society (and in some cases co-sponsored by other organizations) and all are open to the public.

If you decide to attend one of the presentations after learning of it from this blog post, please feel free to drop me a line beforehand, and do introduce yourself after the event.

Sept. 24 at 11:50am - DePaul Law School, Chicago - Debate on the Second Amendment post-Heller

Sept. 24 at 4:30pm - Chicago-Kent School of Law - Panel on Rule of Law in Iraq

Sept. 29 at 5:00pm - University of Cincinnati Law School - Rule of Law and Economic Development

Sept. 30 at 12:00pm - Capital University Law School (Columbus, OH) - Review of October Term 2008/Preview of October Term 2009

Sept. 30 at 3:30pm -  Ohio Northern School of Law (Ada, OH) - Debate on Ricci and Affirmative Action in Employment

Oct. 1 at 12:00pm - University of Toledo Law School - Debate on Ricci and Affrimative Action in Employment

Oct. 1 at 5:00pm - Thomas M. Cooley Law School (Auburn Hills, MI) - Immigration and the Constitution

Oct. 5 at 12:00pm - University of Pennsylvania Law School - Debate on the Use of Foreign Law in Constitutional Interpretation

Oct.6 at 5:30pm - Blank Rome LLP in Philadelphia (Federalist Society Lawyers Chapter; small admission fee) - Panel on Rule of Law in Iraq

Oct. 8 at 1:00pm - Penn State-Dickinson Law School (University Park) - October Term 2009 Preview

Oct. 13 at 5:15pm - George Mason University Law School (Arlington, VA) - October Term 2009 Preview

Oct. 26 at 12:00pm - Florida International University Law School (Miami) - Topic TBA

Oct. 27 at 12:30pm - University of Miami Law School - Topic TBA