Tag: civilian trial

Obama and Military Tribunals

Yesterday, Obama’s attorney general, Eric Holder, held a press conference and announced that Khalid Shaik Mohammed (KSM) would be prosecuted for war crimes before a military tribunal.   It’s probably fair to say, as some newspapers have noted, that the idea of bringing KSM to New York City to be tried in civilian court for the 9/11 atrocity was Holder’s “signature” decision since becoming attorney general–and that that idea is now dead.    However, Obama and Holder conceded a place for tribunals more than a year ago and they could never really offer a good explanation as to why some persons would go to civilian court and why others would go before tribunals.  Like Bush, Cheney, and Rumsfeld, Obama and his people would just sorta decide case-by-case.

Conservatives are chortling over Obama’s apparent embrace of Bush policies, such as keeping Guantanamo open and reviving trials before tribunals.  Like the escalation of the war in Afghanistan, however, Obama has not stumbled on to the correct path.  He has instead shown exceptionally poor judgment yet again.  Two questions are now looming on the horizon.  First, prosecutors are anxious to have a lengthy 9/11 trial, but what if KSM calls the tribunal a farce and decides to skip the trial,  plead guilty, and then demands to be executed so he can become a martyr?  The tribunal might grant the wish, but the legitimacy of the military system may be called into question again–especially in the Muslim world.  Second, the Pentagon has made it pretty clear that anyone acquitted by a tribunal will remain a prisoner at Guantanamo (pdf).  There may be a legal rationale for that, but, again, how is that going to be perceived by the world?   As a start, one might consider how we would react if an American were acquitted by a court abroad, but was nonetheless returned to his prison cell to be detained indefinitely. 

There is no need to go there.  Obama should close Gitmo and transfer the prisoners to Bagram and hold them there, but with full transparency.  The Bush policies of secret prisons, secret interrogation methods, and secret trials before special military courts were wrongheaded and remain so.

For additional background, go here.