Tag: business

Sign the Petition against Protectionism

You only have to glance at the headlines to know that protectionist pressures are rising around the world – from the “Buy American” provision in the stimulus bill to the unnecessary trade war with Mexico to the World Bank’s report last week that 17 members of the G-20 have recently implemented restrictive trade measures.

And you only have to read a history of the 1930s to know that a worldwide turn to protectionism deepened and lengthened the global depression.

So some people are starting an international campaign to protect and expand free trade. The Atlas Economic Research Foundation, the International Policy Network, and the Atlas Global Initiative for Free Trade, Peace, and Prosperity are sponsoring a global Freedom to Trade Petition to be released just before the upcoming G-20 meeting in London. To help head off another Smoot-Hawley-type spiral, please sign the petition. Academic economists, business and labor leaders, authors, and all concerned citizens are encouraged to sign.

And click on ShareThis below to tell your friends!

Miss Manners’s Advice for President Obama

A reader writes to Miss Manners to complain that often she can’t find a seat at a bookstore coffee shop, even though she’s a paying customer and some of the people seated seem not to be buying anything. She suggests that it is obvious that this is not the way to manage a coffee shop in a bookstore and asks Miss Manners how she can politely get the seat she wants. Miss Manners responds:

If you want to manage a coffee shop, Miss Manners suggests you first talk to those who do.

She goes on to explain that bookstores may “do better selling books by being a neighborhood center than they would by checking to see that the tables are occupied only by people who are eating and drinking.” But in any case, the bookstore managers are likely to have a better sense of this than customers who have not invested in the business.

That’s good advice for the Obama administration: If you want to manage a bank, an insurance company, an automobile manufacturer, or any other company, you might try talking to people with expertise. Better yet, you might even let those with skin in the game manage their own companies. If they make mistakes and the government doesn’t bail them out, bad managers will soon enough be weeded out.

Slow Learners in Corporate America

They just figured this out? During the bruhaha surrounding bonuses paid by AIG,  reports the Washington Post:

The attack by lawmakers on AIG pay has provoked renewed complaints from some financial company executives that federal involvement in business decisions is making it difficult for struggling firms to return to profitability. In particular, executives say they need to offer bonuses to keep and motivate their most valuable employees and are already seeing an exodus of talent.

Duh, how could anyone in business not expect federal interference?  The government constantly meddles even when it is not bailing out everyone hither and yon.  But if it’s paying the corporate bills, how could anyone expect it not to get involved?

I have a novel idea.  Maybe business should stop going to Uncle Sam hat-in-hand asking for taxpayer alms.