Tag: affordable care

Tax-consumers Use Our Money to Lobby for More of Our Money

I have two items published today about how governments and other tax-consumers use taxpayer dollars to lobby the government to get more taxpayer dollars. Politico Arena asks, “Will the public warm up to the health care law?” My reply:

I’m amused – at best – that the vast United States government is using my tax dollars to try to persuade voters that the signature legislative accomplishment of the president’s term is actually a good idea. Search Google for the term “Obamacare,” and the first paid link is for healthcare.gov, a government propaganda site for the Affordable Care Act. They’re also using Medicare.gov that way. And roping in poor old Andy Griffith for a TV ad that Factcheck.org says uses “weasel words” to “mislead” seniors.

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said the administration had a “lot of reeducation to do.” If administration officials were confident that their health care scheme was a good idea, they wouldn’t need to spend tax dollars – in a year when the deficit exceeds $1.5 trillion – to try to sell it to the citizens. And this raises a real question for democratic governance: Are the people supposed to tell policymakers what policies they want, or should policymakers use the people’s money to tell them what they should want?

Meanwhile, at the Britannica Blog I cite other examples of tax-funded lobbying:

Between broadcasts of “Downton Abbey” and “Frontline,” PBS viewers are implored to call their congressman and keep the money flowing. Public radio websites blare “Protect KCRW, Write your representative, write your senator.” Announcements on the radio carry the same message….

My colleague Richard Rahn complains, “Taxpayer dollars are also used to fund international organizations, which, in turn, lobby the U.S. Congress for not only more money for themselves, but also for higher taxes on the American people.”…

The Hill newspaper reported in 2009, “Auto companies and eight of the country’s biggest banks that received tens of billions of dollars in federal bailout money spent more than $20 million on lobbying Washington lawmakers in the first half of this year.” Later in the year the Huffington Post found, “Twenty-five top recipients of government bailout funds spent more than $71 million on lobbying in the year since they were rescued.”

And I ask:

Lobbying is constitutionally protected. The First Amendment guarantees not just freedom of speech and of the press but also “the right of the people…to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” But does that mean the government itself has a right to petition itself for a piece of the pie?

Talk of Replacing ObamaCare Is a Bit Premature

Now that a bipartisan coalition in the House has voted to repeal ObamaCare, an even larger bipartisan coalition has approved a Republican resolution directing four House committees to “replace” that ill-fated law.  House Resolution 9 instructs the committees to “propos[e] changes to existing law” with the following goals:

  1. “Foster economic growth and private sector job creation by eliminating job-killing policies and regulations.”
  2. “Lower health care premiums through increased competition and choice.”
  3. “Preserve a patient’s ability to keep his or her health plan if he or she likes it.”
  4. “Provide people with pre-existing conditions access to affordable health coverage.”
  5. “Reform the medical liability system to reduce unnecessary and wasteful health care spending.”
  6. “Increase the number of insured Americans.”
  7. “Protect the doctor-patient relationship.”
  8. “Provide the States greater flexibility to administer Medicaid programs.”
  9. “Expand incentives to encourage personal responsibility for health care coverage and costs.”
  10. “Prohibit taxpayer funding of abortions and provide conscience protections for health care providers.”
  11. “Eliminate duplicative government programs and wasteful spending.”
  12. “Do not accelerate the insolvency of entitlement programs or increase the tax burden on Americans;” or
  13. “Enact a permanent fix to the flawed Medicare sustainable growth rate formula used to determine physician payments under title XVIII of the Social Security Act to preserve health care for the nation’s seniors and to provide a stable environment for physicians.”

Three things about the Republicans’ “replace” effort:

First, America’s health care sector has historically been handicapped by one political party committed to a policy of (mostly) benign neglect, and another party committed to degrading that sector’s performance through government subsidies, mandates, price controls, and other exchange controls.  Republicans now appear to be taking a different posture, and that’s encouraging — but not entirely.  When Republicans set their minds to reforming health care, they are often as bad as Democrats.  (See the Republican “alternatives” to ClintonCare.  Or Medicare Part D.  Or #4-#7 above.)  Exactly how House Republicans plan to deliver on the above goals remains to be seen.

Second, no matter how House Republicans plan to deliver on the above goals, their proposals will be preferable to ObamaCare.  Republicans quite literally could not do worse if they tried.

Third, no matter how good the Republicans’ proposals are, they will be utterly ineffective so long as ObamaCare remains on the books.  ObamaCare’s influence is so pervasive and harmful that it makes real health care reform all but impossible.

So it’s a bit premature to be talking about replacing ObamaCare.

Bad Medicine: A Guide to the Real Costs and Consequences of the New Health Care Law

At more than 2,500 pages and 500,000 words long, the new health care bill — the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — is the most significant transformation of the American health care system since Medicare and Medicaid.

The bill’s complexity has created confusion, frustration, false expectations, and conflicts about its coverage and impact. An incisive new report by Cato scholar Michael D. Tanner provides an authoritative and deeply revealing explanation of its provisions.

The diagnosis: the bill is bad medicine. It is likely to make Americans less healthy, less prosperous, less able to direct their own health care decisions, and places huge burdens on our economy and already massive national debt. It is now certain that the debate over health care reform will be with us for much longer.

Update: Printed copies are now available for purchase for $10.