Supermodels and Monetary Policy

I’m not sure she qualifies as a leading economic indicator, but Gisele Bundchen’s demand to be paid in euros is the latest sign that the dollar may be losing its position as the world’s reserve currency. A supermodel’s currency choice may not be as important as the dollar’s slide against the euro, and it may not mean much compared to the rise in gold prices, but if these other factors aren’t convincing the Fed to protect the value of the dollar, maybe a visit from Gisele would do the trick. Bloomberg reports:

Gisele Bundchen wants to remain the world’s richest model and is insisting that she be paid in almost any currency but the U.S. dollar. …”Contracts starting now are more attractive in euros because we don’t know what will happen to the dollar,” Patricia Bundchen, the model’s twin sister and manager in Brazil, said in a telephone interview in September from Sao Paulo. She declined to discuss details of the arrangements last week, as did Anne Nelson, Bundchen’s agent in New York at IMG Models. …Wealthy clients at San Francisco-based Union Bank of California have doubled their deposits in foreign currencies to $60 million the past two months as a hedge against a decline, said Bradley Shairson, head of currency and derivatives at the bank. …That’s the same strategy as sovereign wealth funds run by the largest exporters and oil producers, including China, Singapore and Qatar, said Stephen Jen, head of currency research at New York-based Morgan Stanley. The funds may grow to $17.5 trillion by 2017 from $2.5 trillion now and shift more than $500 billion out of the dollar in the next three years in search of better returns, he said. “We’re all thinking about diversifying out of the dollar,” said Jen, who is based in London. “It’s a very logical thing.”