R.I.P. Brian Bromberger

One of the treats of my cross-country travels debating various legal and policy issues is meeting people from many walks of life and learning their particular perspectives on issues about which we both care deeply.  One such fascinating person was Brian Bromberger, dean of Loyola University (New Orleans) Law School until his untimely death last week.

Dean Bromberger was 72 when he suffered a fatal heart attack, but I still say his passing was untimely because he was so full of life and vigor.  Born in Australia, Dean Bromberger had taught in many countries around the world and several U.S. law schools.  He is perhaps best known for leading Loyola through Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath – organizing a temporary law school in Houston when New Orleans proved unworkable. 

I only met him a couple of times but he impressed me both with his charm and his keen intellect.  I still clearly recall my first meeting with him, fresh off my second-ever Federalist Society lecture when I was still new to Cato: he ushered me into his office with a welcoming grin, pointing to the “Shalom Y’all” tile on his desk.  (The fraternity of foreign-born Jews with Southern affinities isn’t too big, so it’s always nice to find a kindred spirit.)  I don’t recall exactly what we discussed, but I’m sure it was a combination of comparative law and how New Orleans was recovering from “the storm.”

Loyola is hosting a memorial service at 5:30, and then the funeral will be in Australia next week.  R.I.P.