German Uber Ban Lifted

Today, a court in Frankfurt lifted the temporary ban on Uber’s ride-sharing service imposed at the beginning of this month. Judges were reportedly sympathetic to the claim brought by Taxi Deutschland, an association of taxi dispatchers. However, Judge Frowin Kurth ruled that Taxi Deutschland had waited too long to file for an injunction. A spokesman for the court said that the case must have been filed within two months of Uber’s ride-sharing service launching in Germany.

Taxi Deutschland claimed that Uber’s ride-sharing service was in violation of legislation prohibiting drivers without a commercial license charging passengers more than the operating cost of a ride. 

Although the temporary ban has been lifted the court has not made a judgment on whether Uber’s ride-sharing service is legal in Germany.

Uber has been facing opposition across Europe. In June, London cabbies protested how Uber was being regulated by the city’s transportation agency. In March, Milan taxi drivers held a strike protesting Uber. According to Reuters, Milan’s taxi unions believed Uber was operating illegally:

Milan’s taxi unions say that because the app allows drivers to be summoned while in their car, it violates a 1992 law which describes hired drivers as a service ordered from the garage where their business is based, as distinct from taxis, which can pick up passengers on the move.

 In Germany and the U.K. the Uber protests reportedly resulted in an explosion in signups.