The Public’s Preference for Renewed Federalism

For much of its history, the United States had a notably decentralized government structure. Since the 1930s, the national government has undertaken new efforts to regulate the economy and society and to redistribute resources. Those new efforts have implied a greater centralization of authority in Washington. In the past the public often supported such centralization. However, according to a new study from Cato scholars John Samples and Emily McClintock Ekins, public opinion about federalism has changed. Voters are more supportive of decentralized policymaking on many issues where they previously supported a stronger national role.

The Most Dangerous World Ever?

Dire warnings about our uniquely dangerous world are ubiquitous. But do we actually live in a uniquely dangerous world? And, if we do not, why do we believe that we do?  In the new issue of Cato Policy Report, Cato scholar Christopher Preble puts today’s threats in perspective, and argues, “Tragic, even horrifying, stories of human suffering do not portend that we are living in a more dangerous world. In most respects, we are living longer, better lives.” Also in this issue, Cato chairman Robert A. Levy looks at the expansion of executive powers under President Obama.

Policy Implications of Autonomous Vehicles

Partially autonomous vehicles that can take over some driving functions, such as steering and speed control, are on the market today. Highly autonomous vehicles that can drive themselves in most situations should be available for sale in less than a decade. Fully autonomous vehicles that won’t even have an option for a human driver will be available within a decade after that.  In a new paper, Cato scholar Randal O’Toole argues that legislators and other policymakers should change the way they view transportation, and offers recommendations that should be considered before they make long-range decisions relating to transportation and land use.

Cato Announces Newly Expanded Center for the Study of Science

The Cato Institute is pleased to announce the expansion of its Center for the Study of Science. Founded in 2012, the Center for the Study of Science was created to provide market-based ideas that could transition policy regarding energy consumption, environmental standards, and other science-related issues away from government planners. The Center for the Study of Science will seek to provide a credible source for media and members of the public who want a fresh perspective on scientific claims made by government and other research organizations. Research areas will include energy use and taxation; use of government subsidies; global warming; and overall environmental regulation.

Recent Commentary

Events

September 29

Originalism and the Good Constitution

Featuring the authors John O. McGinnis, George C. Dix Professor in Constitutional Law, Northwestern University Law School; and Michael B. Rappaport, Hugh and Hazel Darling Foundation Professor of Law, University of San Diego Law School; with comments by Roger Pilon, Vice President for Legal Affairs, Cato Institute; and Brianne Gorod, Appellate Counsel, Constitutional Accountability Center; moderated by Trevor Burrus, Research Fellow, Cato Institute.

12:00pm Hayek Auditorium

September 30

Consumer Credit and the American Economy

Featuring the author Todd Zywicki, Professor, George Mason University School of Law; with comments by Anthony Yezer, Professor, Department of Economics, George Washington University; and Heidi M. Schooner, Professor, Columbus School of Law, The Catholic University of America; moderated by Mark Calabria, Director, Financial Regulation Studies, Cato Institute.

12:00pm Hayek Auditorium

Of Special Note

Win a Free GoPro Hero3 Digital Video Camera

Win a Free GoPro Hero3 Digital Video Camera

Sign up in the month of September to receive any of Cato’s free emails, and you’ll automatically become eligible to win a free, brand new GoPro Hero3 digital video camera – waterproof, Wi-Fi compatible, wonderful. A winner will be selected at random on September 30 from the email addresses of all who have signed up.

It’s a win – win. You’ll be able to start receiving emails on upcoming Cato events, links to Cato’s newest research reports, multimedia products, podcasts, special book and ebook offers, and more, while being in line to receive a free GoPro camera. Sign up now.

Special! 10 Copies for $10

Cato Pocket Constitution

To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America’s founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket-size edition.

32nd Annual Monetary Conference

32nd Annual Monetary Conference
Alternatives to Central Banking: Toward Free-Market Money

Thursday, November 6, 2014
9:00 a.m. — 6:15 p.m.

When the Federal Reserve was created in 1913, its powers were limited and the U.S. was on the gold standard. Today the Fed has virtually unlimited power and the dollar has no backing. Leading scholars and advocates for fundamental monetary reform will discuss the case for sound money and the reforms needed to realize it.

Details and registration